Michel de Montaigne

(28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592)

Michel de Montaigne Quotes

  • ''Let us not be ashamed to speak what we shame not to think.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Upon Some Verses of Virgil," bk. 3, ch. 5, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).
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  • ''After all, it is putting a very high price on one's conjectures to have a man roasted alive because of them.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Cripples," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 11, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • ''I speak truth, not my belly-full, but as much as I dare; and I dare the more the more I grow into years.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist, moralist. "Of Repenting," bk. 3, ch. 2, Essays (1580-1588), trans. by John Florio.
  • ''But sure there is need of other remedies than dreaming, a weak contention of art against nature.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Upon some Verses of Virgil," bk. 3, ch. 5, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588).
  • ''Virtue rejects facility to be her companion.... She requires a craggy, rough and thorny way.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. Trans. by John Florio. "Of Cruelty," bk. 2, ch. 11, Essays (1580-1588).
  • ''There is not much less vexation in the government of a private family than in the managing of an entire state.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Solitariness," bk. 1, ch. 38, Essays (1580), trans. by John Florio.
  • ''An able reader often discovers in other people's writings perfections beyond those that the author put in or perceived, and lends them richer meanings and aspects.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Various Outcomes of the Same Plan," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 24, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • ''I cruelly hate cruelty, both by nature and reason, as the worst of all the vices. But then I am so soft in this that I cannot see a chicken's neck wrung without distress, and cannot bear to hear the squealing of a hare between the teeth of my hounds.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Cruelty," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 11, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • ''The greatest thing of the world is for a man to know how to be his own.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Solitariness," bk. 1, ch. 38, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1580).
  • ''There is a certain amount of purpose, acquiescence, and satisfaction in nursing one's melancholy.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "We Taste Nothing Pure," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 20, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

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