Neil Kurshan


Neil Kurshan Quotes

  • ''The power we exert over the future behavior of our children is enormous. Even after they have left home, even after we have left the world, there will always be part of us that will remain with them forever.''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 5 (1987).
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  • ''It is at once the most overwhelmingly frustrating and exasperating task and the most joyous and rewarding experience to make human beings out of children.''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 4 (1987).
  • ''"Walk a mile in my shoes" is good advice. Our children will learn to respect others if they are used to imagining themselves in another's place.''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 4 (1987).
  • ''Raising human beings is a process of teaching children right from wrong and turning them into responsible individuals.''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 1 (1987).
  • ''Too often I hear people say, "Well, at least so-and-so is a good person." When did being a good person become the least thing we can say about another? And are we raising children who will someday find that this is the least thing they can say about themselves?''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. author. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 1 (1987).
  • ''We are better advised and more educated than any other generation of parents. Yet this deluge of literature and advice can also leave us feeling overwhelmed and inadequate. Where is the joy of bringing a child into the world if we are always afraid of making a mistake?''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 3 (1987).
  • ''Can we love our children when they are homely, awkward, unkempt, flaunting the styles and friendships we don't approve of, when they fail to be the best, the brightest, the most accomplished at school or even at home? Can we be there when their world has fallen apart and only we can restore their faith and confidence in life?''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 4 (1987).
  • ''In spite of our worries to the contrary, children are still being born with the innate ability to learn spontaneously, and neither they nor their parents need the sixteen-page instructional manual that came with a rattle ordered for our baby boy!''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 3 (1987).
  • ''The long discussions and painful arguments of adolescence and the fierce loyalties to teachers, heroes, and gurus during the teenage years are simply our children's struggles to ensure that the lifestyles and values they adopt are worthy of their allegiance.''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. Rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 4 (1987).
  • ''The beginnings of altruism can be seen in children as early as the age of two. How then can we be so concerned that they count by the age of three, read by four, and walk with their hands across the overhead parallel bars by five, and not be concerned that they act with kindness to others?''
    Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. author. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 3 (1987).

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