Oliver Goldsmith

(10 November 1730 – 4 April 1774 / County Longford / Ireland)

Oliver Goldsmith Quotes

  • ''I have known a German Prince with more titles than subjects, and a Spanish nobleman with more names than shirts.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Citizen of the World, letter 120 (1762).
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  • ''We had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by the fireside, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 1 (1766).
  • ''I ... chose my wife as she did her wedding-gown, not for a fine glossy surface, but such qualities as would wear well.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 1 (1766).
  • ''Honour sinks where commerce long prevails.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The Traveller, l. 92 (1764).
  • ''Where the broad ocean leans against the land.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish poet, essayist, playwright. The Traveller, l. 284 (1764).
  • ''Law grinds the poor, and rich men rule the law.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The Traveller, l. 386 (1764).
  • ''As writers become more numerous, it is natural for readers to become more indolent; whence must necessarily arise a desire of attaining knowledge with the greatest possible ease.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Upon Unfortunate Merit," The Bee, no. 5 (London, Nov. 3, 1759).
  • ''Could a man live by it, it were not unpleasant employment to be a poet.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter, February 1759, to his brother Henry Goldsmith.
  • ''Life at the greatest and best is but a froward child, that must be humoured and coaxed a little till it falls asleep, and then all the care is over.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Croaker, in The Good Natur'd Man, act 1.
  • ''It seemed to me pretty plain, that they had more of love than matrimony in them.''
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Dr. Charles Primrose, in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 16 (1766).

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Best Poem of Oliver Goldsmith

An Elegy On The Death Of A Mad Dog

Good people all, of every sort,
Give ear unto my song;
And if you find it wondrous short,
It cannot hold you long.

In Islington there was a man
Of whom the world might say,
That still a godly race he ran—
Whene'er he went to pray.

A kind and gentle heart he had,
To comfort friends and foes;
The naked every day he clad—
When he put on his clothes.

And in that town a dog was found,
As many dogs there be,
Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound,
And curs of low degree.

This dog and man at first were friends;
But when a pique ...

Read the full of An Elegy On The Death Of A Mad Dog

A Sonnet

WEEPING, murmuring, complaining,
Lost to every gay delight;
MYRA, too sincere for feigning,
Fears th' approaching bridal night.

Yet, why impair thy bright perfection?
Or dim thy beauty with a tear?
Had MYRA followed my direction,
She long had wanted cause of fear.

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