Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''One should not be too severe on English novels; they are the only relaxation of the intellectually unemployed.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Aug. 4, 1886).
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  • ''Art is not to be taught in Academies. It is what one looks at, not what one listens to, that makes the artist. The real schools should be the streets.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Relation of Dress to Art: A Note in Black and White on Mr. Whistler's Lecture," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
    4 person liked.
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  • ''The great events of life often leave one unmoved; they pass out of consciousness, and, when one thinks of them, become unreal. Even the scarlet flowers of passion seem to grow in the same meadow as the poppies of oblivion.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Erskine, in The Portrait of Mr. W.H., ch. 1, first published in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (July 1889).
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  • ''Philanthropic people lose all sense of humanity. It is their distinguishing characteristic.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
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  • ''Absolute catholicity of taste is not without its dangers. It is only an auctioneer who should admire all schools of art.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Feb. 8, 1886).
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  • ''All costumes are caricatures. The basis of Art is not the Fancy Ball.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Relation of Dress to Art: A Note in Black and White on Mr. Whistler's Lecture," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
    3 person liked.
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  • ''The husbands of very beautiful women belong to the criminal classes.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
    10 person liked.
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  • ''Whatever harsh criticisms may be passed on the construction of her sentences, she at least possesses that one touch of vulgarity that makes the whole world kin.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Book review. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Oct. 28, 1886).
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  • ''A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people's toes.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Roman Candle, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888). Answering the question, "What is a sensitive person?"
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  • ''Nothing makes one so vain as being told that one is a sinner.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Flower Of Love

Sweet, I blame you not, for mine the fault was, had I not been made of common
clay
I had climbed the higher heights unclimbed yet, seen the fuller air, the
larger day.

From the wildness of my wasted passion I had struck a better, clearer song,
Lit some lighter light of freer freedom, battled with some Hydra-headed wrong.

Had my lips been smitten into music by the kisses that but made them bleed,
You had walked with Bice and the angels on that verdant and enamelled meed.

I had trod the road which Dante treading saw the suns of seven circles shine,
Ay! ...

Read the full of Flower Of Love

Santa Decca

THE Gods are dead: no longer do we bring
To grey-eyed Pallas crowns of olive-leaves!
Demeter's child no more hath tithe of sheaves,
And in the noon the careless shepherds sing,
For Pan is dead, and all the wantoning
By secret glade and devious haunt is o'er:
Young Hylas seeks the water-springs no more;
Great Pan is dead, and Mary's Son is King.

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