Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, Intentions (1891).
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  • ''We can have in life but one great experience at best, and the secret of life is to reproduce that experience as often as possible.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 17 (1891).
  • ''Ambition is the last refuge of the failure.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, December 1894).
  • ''To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Soul of Man under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, February 1890).
  • ''His work was that curious mixture of bad painting and good intentions that always entitles a man to be called a representative British artist.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891). Referring to Basil Hallward.
  • ''Religions die when they are proved to be true. Science is the record of dead religions.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
  • ''There is no necessity to separate the monarch from the mob; all authority is equally bad.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).
  • ''If they have not opened the eyes of the blind, they have at least given great encouragement to the short-sighted, and while their leaders may have all the inexperience of old age, their young men are far too wise to be ever sensible.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891). Speaking of the Impressionists. "Yet," he added, "they will insist on treating painting as if it were a mode of autobiography invented for the use of the illiterate."
  • ''There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).
  • ''Dullness is the coming of age of seriousness.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Santa Decca

THE Gods are dead: no longer do we bring
To grey-eyed Pallas crowns of olive-leaves!
Demeter's child no more hath tithe of sheaves,
And in the noon the careless shepherds sing,
For Pan is dead, and all the wantoning
By secret glade and devious haunt is o'er:
Young Hylas seeks the water-springs no more;
Great Pan is dead, and Mary's Son is King.

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