Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''If property had simply pleasures, we could stand it; but its duties make it unbearable. In the interest of the rich we must get rid of it.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, The Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891).
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  • ''Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
  • ''There is no such thing as an omen. Destiny does not send us heralds. She is too wise or too cruel for that.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 17 (1891).
  • ''Time is waste of money.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
  • ''The fact is, the public make use of the classics of a country as a means of checking the progress of Art. They degrade the classics into authorities. They use them as bludgeons for preventing the free expression of Beauty in new forms.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).
  • ''Public Opinion ... an attempt to organise the ignorance of the community, and to elevate it to the dignity of physical force.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
  • ''I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
  • ''There is something tragic about the enormous number of young men there are in England at the present moment who start life with perfect profiles, and end by adopting some useful profession.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, Chameleon (London, December 1894).
  • ''Conversation should touch everything, but should concentrate itself on nothing.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
  • ''It often happens that the real tragedies of life occur in such an inartistic manner that they hurt us by their crude violence, their absolute incoherence, their absurd want of meaning, their entire lack of style.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Le Panneau

Under the rose-tree's dancing shade
There stands a little ivory girl,
Pulling the leaves of pink and pearl
With pale green nails of polished jade.

The red leaves fall upon the mould,
The white leaves flutter, one by one,
Down to a blue bowl where the sun,
Like a great dragon, writhes in gold.

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