Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''Personality must be accepted for what it is. You mustn't mind that a poet is a drunk, rather that drunks are not always poets.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 21 (1987). Of poet Ernest Dowson.
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  • ''Nobody of any real culture, for instance, ever talks nowadays about the beauty of sunset. Sunsets are quite old fashioned.... To admire them is a distinct sign of provincialism of temperament. Upon the other hand they go on.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, Intentions (1891).
  • ''Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2 (1891).
  • ''Yes, I am a thorough republican. No other form of government is so favorable to the growth of art.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. remark, Feb. 21, 1882, Louisville, Ky. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 7 (1987).
  • ''It is always the unreadable that occurs.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
  • ''The man who sees both sides of a question is a man who sees absolutely nothing at all.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
  • ''Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).
  • ''We Irish are too poetical to be poets; we are a nation of brilliant failures, but we are the greatest talkers since the Greeks.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 11 (1987). Said, Christmas 1888, to poet W.B. Yeats.
  • ''The more one analyses people, the more all reasons for analysis disappear. Sooner or later one comes to that dreadful universal thing called human nature.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
  • ''Formerly we used to canonise our heroes. The modern method is to vulgarise them. Cheap editions of great books may be delightful, but cheap editions of great men are absolutely detestable.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, Intentions (1891).

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Rome Unvisited

I.
THE corn has turned from grey to red,
Since first my spirit wandered forth
From the drear cities of the north,
And to Italia's mountains fled.

And here I set my face towards home,
For all my pilgrimage is done,
Although, methinks, yon blood-red sun

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