Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''There is nothing so difficult to marry as a large nose.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Markby, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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  • ''One knows so well the popular idea of health. The English country gentleman galloping after a fox—the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1 (1893).
  • ''Relations are simply a tedious pack of people, who haven't got the remotest knowledge of how to live, nor the smallest instinct about when to die.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1 (1895).
  • ''I'm sure I don't know half the people who come to my house. Indeed, from all I hear, I shouldn't like to.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Markby, in An Ideal Husband, act 2.
  • ''Nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humour in the woman.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1.
  • ''Really, if the lower orders don't set us a good example, what on earth is the use of them? They seem, as a class, to have absolutely no sense of moral responsibility.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1 (1895).
  • ''Don't tell me that you have exhausted Life. When a man says that, one knows that life has exhausted him.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Narborough, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
  • ''Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our gigantic intellects.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3 (1893). The remark had also appeared, two years earlier, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
  • ''The liar at any rate recognizes that recreation, not instruction, is the aim of conversation, and is a far more civilised being than the blockhead who loudly expresses his disbelief in a story which is told simply for the amusement of the company.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). "Aristotle at Afternoon Tea," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
  • ''You should study the Peerage, Gerald. It is the one book a young man about town should know thoroughly, and it is the best thing in fiction the English have ever done.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Le Panneau

Under the rose-tree's dancing shade
There stands a little ivory girl,
Pulling the leaves of pink and pearl
With pale green nails of polished jade.

The red leaves fall upon the mould,
The white leaves flutter, one by one,
Down to a blue bowl where the sun,
Like a great dragon, writhes in gold.

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