Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''Popularity is the crown of laurel which the world puts on bad art. Whatever is popular is wrong.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lecture, June 30, 1883, to students of the Royal Academy, London. Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991).
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  • ''London is full of women who trust their husbands. One can always recognise them. They look so thoroughly unhappy.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Windermere, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 2.
  • ''Musical people are so absurdly unreasonable. They always want one to be perfectly dumb at the very moment when one is longing to be absolutely deaf.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mabel Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 2.
  • ''I love London society! I think it has immensely improved. It is entirely composed now of beautiful idiots and brilliant lunatics. Just what Society should be.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mabel Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
  • ''It is only the unimaginative who ever invents. The true artist is known by the use he makes of what he annexes.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Art review (May 30, 1885).
  • ''The sign of a Philistine age is the cry of immorality against art.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Lecture Delivered to the Art Students of the Royal Academy, June 30, 1883," Essays and Lectures (1908).
  • ''Either that wallpaper goes, or I do.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Attributed. Last words as he lay dying in a drab Paris hotel room, recorded in variant forms in R.H. Sherard, Life of Oscar Wilde (1906) and Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde (1988).
  • ''Nothing is impossible in Russia but reform.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Michael, in Vera, or The Nihilists (1880).

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Le Panneau

Under the rose-tree's dancing shade
There stands a little ivory girl,
Pulling the leaves of pink and pearl
With pale green nails of polished jade.

The red leaves fall upon the mould,
The white leaves flutter, one by one,
Down to a blue bowl where the sun,
Like a great dragon, writhes in gold.

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