Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''They are horribly tedious when they are good husbands, and abominably conceited when they are not.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
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  • ''She is absolutely inadmissible into society. Many a woman has a past, but I am told that she has at least a dozen, and that they all fit.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Duchess of Berwick, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 1 (1893). Referring to Mrs. Erlynne.
  • ''My experience is that as soon as people are old enough to know better, they don't know anything at all.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecil Graham, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 2.
  • ''Examinations, sir, are pure humbug from beginning to end. If a man is a gentleman, he knows quite enough, and if he is not a gentleman, whatever he knows is bad for him.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Fermor, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891). Lord Illingworth makes the same declaration in A Woman of No Importance (act 3), first performed three years after the publication of Dorian Gray.
  • ''Life, Lady Stutfield, is simply a mauvais quart d'heure made up of exquisite moments.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2 (1893).
  • ''A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at, for it leaves out the one country at which Humanity is always landing.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In The Soul of Man Under Socialism (1895). The Fortnightly Review (Feb. 1891).
  • ''A sentimentalist, my dear Darlington, is a man who sees an absurd value in everything, and doesn't know the market price of any single thing.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecil Graham, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3.
  • ''To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 3. The quip had already appeared in Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, in Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
  • ''I delight in men over seventy. They always offer one the devotion of a lifetime.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 4.
  • ''I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time, and prevents arguments.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The frog, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).

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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Her Voice

THE wild bee reels from bough to bough
With his furry coat and his gauzy wing.
Now in a lily-cup, and now
Setting a jacinth bell a-swing,
In his wandering;
Sit closer love: it was here I trow
I made that vow,

Swore that two lives should be like one
As long as the sea-gull loved the sea,
As long as the sunflower sought the sun,--
It shall be, I said, for eternity
...

Read the full of Her Voice

Quantum Mutata

THERE was a time in Europe long ago
When no man died for freedom anywhere,
But England's lion leaping from its lair
Laid hands on the oppressor! it was so
While England could a great Republic show.
Witness the men of Piedmont, chiefest care
Of Cromwell, when with impotent despair
The Pontiff in his painted portico
Trembled before our stern ambassadors.

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