Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Oscar Wilde Quotes

  • ''There is always something ridiculous about the emotions of people whom one has ceased to love.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 7 (1891).
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  • ''Crying is the refuge of plain women but the ruin of pretty ones.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Duchess of Berwick, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 1.
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  • ''There is always something infinitely mean about other people's tragedies.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).
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  • ''Romance should never begin with sentiment. It should begin with science and end with a settlement.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Cheveley, in An Ideal Husband, act 3.
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  • ''There is a luxury in self-reproach. When we blame ourselves we feel no one else has a right to blame us.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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  • ''It is an odd thing, but every one who disappears is said to be seen at San Francisco. It must be a delightful city, and possess all the attractions of the next world.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 18 (1891).
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  • ''The strength of women comes from the fact that psychology cannot explain us. Men can be analysed, women ... merely adored.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Cheveley, in The Ideal Husband, act 1.
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  • ''We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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  • ''In this world there are two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it. The last is much the worst.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Dumby, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3. George Bernard Shaw expressed a similar idea in act 4, Man and Superman, published ten years after Lady Windermere's Fan, when Mendoza says: "There are two tragedies in life. One is to lose your heart's desire. The other is to gain it."
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  • ''Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.''
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
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Best Poem of Oscar Wilde

Flower Of Love

Sweet, I blame you not, for mine the fault was, had I not been made of common
clay
I had climbed the higher heights unclimbed yet, seen the fuller air, the
larger day.

From the wildness of my wasted passion I had struck a better, clearer song,
Lit some lighter light of freer freedom, battled with some Hydra-headed wrong.

Had my lips been smitten into music by the kisses that but made them bleed,
You had walked with Bice and the angels on that verdant and enamelled meed.

I had trod the road which Dante treading saw the suns of seven circles shine,
Ay! ...

Read the full of Flower Of Love

Le Panneau

Under the rose-tree's dancing shade
There stands a little ivory girl,
Pulling the leaves of pink and pearl
With pale green nails of polished jade.

The red leaves fall upon the mould,
The white leaves flutter, one by one,
Down to a blue bowl where the sun,
Like a great dragon, writhes in gold.

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