Philip Dormer Stanhope

[4th Earl Chesterfield]

Philip Dormer Stanhope Quotes

  • ''A young fellow ought to be wiser than he should seem to be; and an old fellow ought to seem wise whether he really be so or not.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, undated (1752?), Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. III, p. 329, London (1774).
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  • ''Half the business is done, when one has gained the heart and the affections of those with whom one is to transact it.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, July 21, 1752, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. III, p. 333, London (1774).
  • ''Judgment is not upon all occasions required, but discretion always is.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, undated, Chesterfield's Letters to his Son and Others, p. 299, London, Dent (1796). Written to his godson Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl (1755-1815), a distant relative of Chesterfield's, who eventually became his heir and successor.
  • ''He had not the least pride of birth and rank, that common narrow notion of little minds, that wretched mistaken succedaneum of merit.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 43, University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Character of Lord Scarborough, one of Chesterfield's closest friends.
  • ''Most people enjoy the inferiority of their best friends.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. repr. in The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 229, ed. Charles Strachey (1901). Letter, July 9, 1750 (1774).
  • ''Pleasure is necessarily reciprocal; no one feels it who does not at the same time give it. To be pleased, one must please. What pleases you in others, will in general please them in you.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, July 9, 1750, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. III, p. 46, London (1774).
  • ''In business be as able as you can, but do not be cunning; cunning is the dark sanctuary of incapacity.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, undated, Chesterfield's Letters to his Son and Others, p. 305, London, Dent (1796). Written to his godson Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl (1755-1815), a distant relative of Chesterfield's, who eventually became his heir and successor; the letter included instructions that it be delivered to the godson after Chesterfield's death.
  • ''He was as jealous of his power as an impotent lover of his mistress, without activity of mind enough to enjoy or exert it, but could not bear a share even in the appearances of it.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 49, University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Character of Sir Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle (1693-1768), Prime Minister of Britain, 1754-1756, and, with William Pitt, 1757-1761.
  • ''Give nobly to indigent merit, and do not refuse your charity even to those who have not merit but their misery.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, undated, Chesterfield's Letters to his Son and Others, p. 306, London, Dent (1796). Written to his godson Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl (1755-1815), a distant relative of Chesterfield's, who eventually became his heir and successor; the letter included instructions that it be delivered to the godson after Chesterfield's death.
  • ''While abroad, he met with a very salacious English woman, whose liberality retrieved his fortune, with several circumstances more to the honor of his vigor than his morals.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 54, University of California, Los Angeles (199). Character of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland (1705-74), statesman and politician.

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