Philip Dormer Stanhope

[4th Earl Chesterfield]

Philip Dormer Stanhope Quotes

  • ''The possibility of remedying imprudent actions is commonly an inducement to commit them.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 319, London (1774). A maxim attributed by Chesterfield to Jean-Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz (1613-1679), whose Mémoires and Maximes he often quoted.
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  • ''Whoever is in a hurry, shows that the thing he is about is too big for him.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Aug. 30, 1749, first published (1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 1, no. 190, ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''The best way to compel weak-minded people to adopt our opinion, is to frighten them from all others, by magnifying their danger.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 320, London (1774). A maxim attributed by Chesterfield to Jean-Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz (1613-1679), whose Mémoires and Maximes he often quoted.
  • ''I look upon indolence as a sort of suicide; for the man is effectually destroyed, though the appetites of the brute may survive.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Feb. 26, 1754. The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 308, first published (1774), ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''A certain degree of fear produces the same effects as rashness.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 320, London (1774). A maxim attributed by Chesterfield to Jean-Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz (1613-1679), whose Mémoires and Maximes he often quoted.
  • ''Speak of the moderns without contempt, and of the ancients without idolatry.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, February 22, 1748 (first published 1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 1, no. 142, ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''When griefs are genuine, I find, there is nothing more vacuous, more burdensome, or even more impertinent, than letters of consolation.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Aug. 1, 1751, The French Correspondence of the 4th Earl of Chesterfield, vol. I, p. 89, ed. Rex A. Barrell, trans. James Gray, Ottawa, Borealis Press (1980) I. 89. This letter was addressed to Mme. La Marquise, whose mother was seriously ill at the time.
  • ''The talent of insinuation is more useful than that of persuasion, as everybody is open to insinuation, but scarce any to persuasion.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 320, London (1774). A maxim attributed by Chesterfield to Jean-Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz (1613-1679), whose Mémoires and Maximes he often quoted.
  • ''Our prejudices are our mistresses; reason is at best our wife, very often heard indeed, but seldom minded.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, April 13, 1752 (first published 1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 276, ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''The permanency of most friendships depends upon the continuity of good fortune.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 322, London (1774). A maxim attributed by Chesterfield to Jean-Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz (1613-1679), whose Mémoires and Maximes he often quoted.

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