Philip Dormer Stanhope

[4th Earl Chesterfield]

Philip Dormer Stanhope Quotes

  • ''People will no more advance their civility to a bear, than their money to a bankrupt.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 25, 1753, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 36, London (1774).
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  • ''I am in the pitiable situation of feeling all the force of temptation without having the strength to succumb to it.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, May 23, 1751, The French Correspondence of the 4th Earl of Chesterfield, vol. I, p. 87, ed. Rex A. Barrell, trans. James Gray, Ottawa, Borealis Press (1980).
  • ''Be wiser than other people, if you can; but do not tell them so.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Nov. 29, 1745, first published (1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 1, no. 104, ed. Charles Strachey (1901). Some editions give this letter as dated Nov. 19, 1745.
  • ''Armies, though always the supporters and tools of absolute power for the time being, are always the destroyers of it too; by frequently changing the hands in which they think proper to lodge it.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 25, 1753, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. IV, p. 38, London (1774).
  • ''You must embrace the man you hate, if you cannot be justified in knocking him down.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, January 15, 1753, first published 1774. The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 297, ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''It seems to me that physical sickness softens, just as moral sickness hardens, the heart.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 25, 1755, The French Correspondence of the 4th Earl of Chesterfield, vol. I, p. 106, ed. Rex A. Barrell, trans. James Gray, Ottawa, Borealis Press (1980).
  • ''In my mind, there is nothing so illiberal, and so ill-bred, as audible laughter.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, March 9, 1748, first published (1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 1, no. 144, ed. Charles Strachey (1901). In a later letter, Dec. 12, 1765, Chesterfield wrote: "Observe it, the vulgar often laugh, but never smile, whereas well-bred people often smile, and seldom or never laugh. A witty thing never excited laughter, it pleases only the mind and never distorts the countenance." (Lord Chesterfield's Letters to His Godson, no. 135, ed. Earl of Carnarvon, 1889).
  • ''Any affectation whatsoever in dress implies, in my mind, a flaw in the understanding.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, 30 Dec. 1748, first published (1774). The Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield to His Son, vol. 2, no. 225, ed. Charles Strachey (1901).
  • ''Conscious virtue is the only solid foundation of all happiness; for riches, power, rank, or whatever, in the common acceptation of the word, is supposed to constitute happiness, will never quiet, much less cure, the inward pangs of guilt.''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Dec. 26, 1749, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 307, London (1774).
  • ''Thirty years ago I said, "But how can one be sick?" But now I say, "If only one could find the secret of not being sick, I would not exchange it for all the secrets in the world."''
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Letter, May 7, 1752, The French Correspondence of the 4th Earl of Chesterfield, vol. I, p. 93, ed. Rex A. Barrell, trans. James Gray, Ottawa, Borealis Press (1980).

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