Plato


Plato Quotes

  • ''On the threshold of old age.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic, 328 E....
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  • ''Tyranny naturally arises out of democracy.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic, 564 A....
  • ''They will take a state and human nature for their tablet, and begin by making a clean surface.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic, 501 A....
  • ''The highest reach of injustice is to be deemed just when you are not.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic, 361 A....
  • ''Justice means minding one's own business and not meddling with other men's concerns.''
    Plato (427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic 4.433a, trans. by Cornford. It is not agreed among scholars whether this is the view of Socrates, of Plato, or just of the character in the dialogue.
  • ''Until philosophers hold power, neither states nor individuals will have rest from trouble.''
    Plato (427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Republic 501e, trans. by Cornford.
  • ''These, then, will be some of the features of democracy ... it will be, in all likelihood, an agreeable, lawless, particolored commonwealth, dealing with all alike on a footing of equality, whether they be really equal or not.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Socrates, in The Republic, bk. 8, sct. 558.
  • ''No trace of slavery ought to mix with the studies of the freeborn man.... No study, pursued under compulsion, remains rooted in the memory.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Socrates, in The Republic, bk. 7, sct. 536.
  • ''We ought to esteem it of the greatest importance that the fictions which children first hear should be adapted in the most perfect manner to the promotion of virtue.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Socrates, in The Republic, bk. 2, sct. 378.
  • ''No trace of slavery ought to mix with the studies of the freeborn man.... No study, pursued under compulsion, remains rooted in the memory.''
    Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Socrates, in The Republic, bk. 7, sct. 536e.

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Best Poem of Plato

Love Asleep

We reached the grove's deep shadow and there found
Cythera's son in sleep's sweet fetters bound;
Looking like ruddy apples on their tree;
No quiver and no bended bow had he;
These were suspended on a leafy spray.
Himself in cups of roses cradled lay,
Smiling in sleep; while from their flight in air,
The brown bees to his soft lips made repair,
To ply their waxen task and leave their honey there.

Read the full of Love Asleep

Neath This Tall Pine

Neath this tall pine,
That to the zephyr sways and murmurs low,
Mayst thou recline,
While near thee cooling waters flow.
This flute of mine
Shall pipe the softest song it knows to sing,
And to thy charmèd eyelids sleep will bring.

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