Classical Poems

1.
Jacques Prevert
Rappelle-toi Barbara
Il pleuvait sans cesse sur Brest ce jour-là
Et tu marchais souriante
Épanouie ravie ruisselante
...
2.
Richard Lovelace
TO AMARANTHA; THAT SHE WOULD DISHEVELL HER HAIRE.

I.
Amarantha sweet and faire,
...
3.
Evie Shockley
you put this pen
in my hand and you
take the pen from you put this pen
...
4.
Barbara Guest
On this dry prepared path walk heavy feet.
This is not "dinner music." This is a power structure.
...
5.
Richard Lovelace
"Come, pretty birds, present your lays,
And learn to chaunt a goddess praise;
Ye wood-nymphs, let your voices be
Employ'd to serve her deity:
...
6.
Robert William Service
If you had the choice of two women to wed,
(Though of course the idea is quite absurd)
And the first from her heels to her dainty head
Was charming in every sense of the word:
...
7.
Emily Jane Brontë
A little while, a little while,
The weary task is put away,
And I can sing and I can smile,
Alike, while I have holiday.
...
8.
Banjo Paterson
Long ago the Gladiators,
When the call to combat came,
Marching past the massed spectators,
Hailed the Emp'ror with acclaim!
...
9.
Thomas Hardy
Between us now and here -
   Two thrown together
Who are not wont to wear
   Life's flushest feather -
...
10.
Eugene Field
On afternoons, when baby boy has had a splendid nap,
And sits, like any monarch on his throne, in nurse's lap,
In some such wise my handkerchief I hold before my face,
And cautiously and quietly I move about the place;
...
11.
Emily Dickinson
185

"Faith" is a fine invention
When Gentlemen can see—
...
12.
Robert William Service
A Life Tragedy

A pistol shot rings round and round the world;
In pitiful defeat a warrior lies.
...
13.
Edith Matilda Thomas
Apple-green west and an orange bar,
And the crystal eye of a lone, one star . . .
And, "Child, take the shears and cut what you will,
Frost to-night -- so clear and dead-still."
...
14.
Robert Browning
Heap cassia, sandal-buds and stripes
Of labdanum, and aloe-balls,
Smeared with dull nard an Indian wipes
From out her hair: such balsam falls
...
15.
Emily Dickinson
575

"Heaven" has different Signs—to me—
Sometimes, I think that Noon
...
16.
Emily Dickinson
239

"Heaven"—is what I cannot reach!
The Apple on the Tree—
...
17.
Emily Dickinson
127

"Houses"—so the Wise Men tell me—
"Mansions"! Mansions must be warm!
...
18.
Thomas Hardy
How great my grief, my joys how few,
Since first it was my fate to know thee!
- Have the slow years not brought to view
How great my grief, my joys how few,
...
19.
Thomas Hardy
I

I have lived with shades so long,
And talked to them so oft,
...
20.
Thomas Hardy
I said to Love,
"It is not now as in old days
When men adored thee and thy ways
   All else above;
...
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4/22/2021 9:33:53 PM # 1.0.0.560