Polly Berrien Berends


Polly Berrien Berends Quotes

  • ''We do not have to get our children to learn; only to allow and encourage them in their learning. We do not have to dictate what they should learn; only to discern and respond to what it is that they are learning. Such responsiveness is at once the most educational and the most loving.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 3 (rev. 1987).
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  • ''We cannot spare our children the influence of harmful values by turning off the television any more than we can keep them home forever or revamp the world before they get there. Merely keeping them in the dark is no protection and, in fact, can make them vulnerable and immature.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 7 (rev. 1987).
  • ''Especially with our first child, we tend to take too much responsibility—both credit and blame—for everything. The more we want to be good parents, the more we tend to see ourselves as making or breaking our children.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 3 (rev. 1987).
  • ''We can see that the baby is as much an instrument of nourishment for us as we are for him.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).
  • ''A sense of worthiness is a child's most important need.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 3 (rev. 1987).
  • ''With all of its bad influences, T.V. is not to be feared.... It can be a fairly safe laboratory for confronting, seeing through, and thus being immunized against unhealthy values so as to be "in the world but not of it."''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 7 (rev. 1987).
  • ''Parenthood always comes as a shock. Postpartum blues? Postpartum panic is more like it. We set out to have a baby; what we get is a total take-over of our lives.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).
  • ''The trouble with most problem-solving books for parents is that they start with the idea that the child has a problem. Then they try to tell us how to fix the child, or else, after blaming the parent, they suggest how we can fix ourselves.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).
  • ''If you think of learning as a path, you can picture yourself walking beside her rather than either pushing or dragging or carrying her along.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 3 (rev. 1987).
  • ''Suddenly we have a baby who poops and cries, and we are trying to calm, clean up, and pin things together all at once. Then as fast as we learn to cope—so soon—it is hard to recall why diapers ever seemed so important. The frontiers change, and now perhaps we have a teenager we can't reach.''
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).

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