Publius Vergilius Maro

[Virgil] (70 BC- 19 BC / Virgilio)

Publius Vergilius Maro Quotes

  • ''O accursed hunger of gold, to what dost thou not compel human hearts!''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneas, in Aeneid, bk. 3, l. 56-7 (19 B.C.), trans. by J.W. MacKail (1908). Alluding to the story of Polydorus, who was killed for his gold by the treacherous King of Thrace during the Trojan War. In Dante's Purgatory, cto. 22, Virgil's lines are seemingly misconstrued by Statius.
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  • ''From a single crime know the nation.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 2, l. 65.
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  • ''The gods thought otherwise.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 2, l. 428 (19 B.C.).
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  • ''The land of joy, the lovely glades of the fortunate woods and the home of the blest.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 638 (19 B.C.), trans. by David West (1991). Referring to the Elysian Fields, a stop on Aeneas's journey to the Underworld.
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  • ''Perhaps one day this too will be pleasant to remember.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 1, l. 203. Addressed to his men, referring to the difficulties of the journey to Latium.
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  • ''Each of us suffers his own fate in the after-life.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Anchises, in Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 743 (19 B.C.), trans. by David West (1991). Anchises to his son Aeneas in the Underworld.
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  • ''Roman, remember that you shall rule the nations by your authority, for this is to be your skill, to make peace the custom, to spare the conquered, and to wage war until the haughty are brought low.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Anchises, in Aeneid, bk. 6. Describing the task of the Romans.
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  • ''Harsh necessity, and the newness of my kingdom, force me to do such things and to guard my frontiers everywhere.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Dido, Queen of Carthage, in Aeneid, bk. 1.
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  • ''There's a snake lurking in the grass.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Eclogues, no. 3, l. 93 (37 B.C.).
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  • ''Your descendants shall gather your fruits.''
    Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Eclogues, no. 9, l. 50 (37 B.C.).
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