Queen Elizabeth I

(1533-1603 / England)

Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

  • ''I think he and I should get married!''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 6, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to de Silva, the Spanish Ambassador, when he told her that the Pope had a high opinion of her ability. Elizabeth was a Protestant, which had led to great political strife with those who wished to have a Roman Catholic monarch. Sought after by many noblemen, and urged by her countrymen to marry, Elizabeth steadfastly refused.
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  • ''I, a virgin, can make my frank boast that I communicate to no mortal man my secret counsels except to such as I have chosen on account of their taciturnity; then, if these secrets are later discovered, I know whom to accuse.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1561 to the Swedish Ambassador. Elizabeth remained single all her life.
  • ''To be a king and wear a crown is more glorious to them that see it than it is pleasure to them that bear it.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 6, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the House of Commons when she disbanded Parliament in 1601 for the last time in her life.
  • ''Must! Is must a word to be addressed to princes? Little man, little man! thy father, if he had been alive, durst not have used that word.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Queen of England. Quoted in A Short History of the English People, ch. 7, J.R. Green (1874). Attributed remonstrance to Sir Robert Cecil, who had urged her to go to bed in her last illness, March 1603; both Robert and his father William Cecil (Lord Burghley) were secretaries of state to Elizabeth.
  • ''I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England, too.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England. speech, Aug. 8, 1588. To troops at Tilbury, England, on the approach of the Spanish Armada.
  • ''All my possessions for a moment of time.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Queen of England. Alleged last words.
  • ''My lord, the crown which I have borne so long has given enough of vanity in my time. I beseech you not to augment it in this hour when I am so near my death.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 24, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said on the last night of her life, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, who was praying by her side and had been extolling the accomplishments of her reign. These are her last recorded words.
  • ''I would rather be a beggar and single than a queen and married.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 7, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1564 to the Ambassador of the Duke of Wurtemberg. Elizabeth never married and died leaving no heir.
  • ''Do not tell secrets to those whose faith and silence you have not already tested.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1561 to the King of Sweden.
  • ''I shall lend credit to nothing against my people which parents would not believe against their own children.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British Monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 2, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in the late 1500s.

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Best Poem of Queen Elizabeth I

On Monsieur's Departure

I grieve and dare not show my discontent,
I love and yet am forced to seem to hate,
I do, yet dare not say I ever meant,
I seem stark mute but inwardly to prate.
I am and not, I freeze and yet am burned.
Since from myself another self I turned.

My care is like my shadow in the sun,
Follows me flying, flies when I pursue it,
Stands and lies by me, doth what I have done.
His too familiar care doth make me rue it.
No means I find to rid him from my breast,
Till by the end of things it be supprest.

Some gentler passion slide into my mind, ...

Read the full of On Monsieur's Departure

Oh, Fortune!

Oh, Fortune! how thy restlesse wavering state
Hath fraught with cares my troubled witt!
Witnes this present prisonn, whither fate
Could beare me, and the joys I quitt.
Thou causedest the guiltie to be losed
From bandes, wherein are innocents inclosed:
Causing the guiltles to be straite reserved,
And freeing those that death had well deserved.
But by her envie can be nothing wroughte,

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