Queen Elizabeth I

(1533-1603 / England)

Queen Elizabeth I Quotes

  • ''The name of a successor is like the tolling of my own death-bell!''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 24, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said near the end of her life. Elizabeth, who never married and died without an heir, refused, despite much urging, to name a successor until she was on her deathbed. He was Mary, Queen of Scots' son, James VI, King of Scotland, who became King James I of England (1566-1625; King of Scotland, 1567-1625; King of England, 1603-1625). In 1586, he had broken with his mother, who was Elizabeth's rival for the throne and had schemed against her, to ally himself with Elizabeth. Mary was executed in 1587.
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  • ''I have the heart of a man, not a woman, and I am not afraid of anything.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 3, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to the Swedish Ambassador early in her reign.
  • ''There is nothing about which I am more anxious than my country, and for its sake I am willing to die ten deaths, if that be possible.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 2, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Translated from the Latin. Written in 1564 to the Ambassador of the Duke of Wurtemberg.
  • ''Monarchs ought to put to death the authors and instigators of war, as their sworn enemies and as dangers to their states.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Fenelon, the French Ambassador.
  • ''One man with a head on his shoulders is worth a dozen without.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923).
  • ''There is small disproportion betwixt a fool who useth not wit because he hath it not and him that useth it not when it should avail him.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said c. 1587 to Baron Buckhurst (born Thomas Sackville, first Earl of Dorset), on a diplomatic mission to the Netherlands, where he displeased her.
  • ''I do not choose that my grave should be dug while I am still alive.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 24, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said to a deputation of peers who urged her to marry.
  • ''I would rather go to any extreme than suffer anything that is unworthy of my reputation, or of that of my crown.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 13, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To Fenelon, the French Ambassador.
  • ''Madame d'Estampes and Madame de Valentinois make me fear that I should be only honoured by my husband as a queen and not loved by him as a woman.''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 7, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said c. 1564 to Fenelon, the French Ambassador, who urged her to marry into the French royalty. D'Estampes and de Valentinois were well known to be illicit mistresses of members of the French royal family.
  • ''Mortua—sed non sepulta! Mortua—sed non sepulta! [Dead—but not buried! Dead—but not buried!]''
    Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 3, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). Said in 1599, upon learning of rumors that she had died. She would repeat this often until her actual death.

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Best Poem of Queen Elizabeth I

In Defiance Of Fortune

Never think you fortune can bear the sway
Where virtue's force can cause her to obey.

Read the full of In Defiance Of Fortune

Oh, Fortune!

Oh, Fortune! how thy restlesse wavering state
Hath fraught with cares my troubled witt!
Witnes this present prisonn, whither fate
Could beare me, and the joys I quitt.
Thou causedest the guiltie to be losed
From bandes, wherein are innocents inclosed:
Causing the guiltles to be straite reserved,
And freeing those that death had well deserved.
But by her envie can be nothing wroughte,

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