Quotations About / On: CHANGE

  • 81.
    We think that we can change our clothes only.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 366, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 82.
    To the sick the doctors wisely recommend a change of air and scenery.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 352, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 83.
    Use almost can change the stamp of nature.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 168. Proverbial; "stamp of nature" means innate characteristics.)
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  • 84.
    Human-nature will not change.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 101, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
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  • 85.
    The familiar changes as we cling to it.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eleventh Selection, New York (1993).)
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  • 86.
    Complainers change their complaints, but they never reduce the amount of time spent in complaining.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, change, time
  • 87.
    Take one of those every half-mile and call me if there is any change.
    (Robert Pirosh, U.S. screenwriter, George Seaton, George Oppenheimer, and Sam Wood. Dr. Hugo Z. Hackenbush (Groucho Marx), A Day at the Races, medical advice given to a sick race horse Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) slips some pills to (1937).)
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  • 88.
    ... all big changes in human history have been arrived at slowly and through many compromises.
    (Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), U.S. First Lady, author, and speaker. As quoted in Eleanor and Franklin, ch. 27, by Joseph P. Lash (1971). Stated in 1925.)
    More quotations from: Eleanor Roosevelt, history
  • 89.
    The cues that arouse desire are changed by Fashion, but feel like the proddings of Nature.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Second Selection, New York (1985).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, nature
  • 90.
    Change alone is unchanging.
    (Heraclitus (c. 535-c. 475 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Herakleitos and Diogenes, pt. 1, fragment 23, trans. by Guy Davenport (1976).)
    More quotations from: Heraclitus, change, alone
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