Quotations About / On: CITY

  • 41.
    Most benefactors are like unskillful generals who take the city and leave the citadel intact.
    (Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort (1741-1794), French writer, wit. Maxims and Considerations, vol. 2, no. 576 (1796, trans. 1926).)
  • 42.
    The city is not a concrete jungle, it is a human zoo.
    (Desmond Morris (b. 1928), British anthropologist. The Human Zoo, introduction (1969).)
    More quotations from: Desmond Morris, concrete, city
  • 43.
    In a strange city, I connect through food and fantasy.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Third Selection, New York (1986).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, food, city
  • 44.
    Washington isn't a city, it's an abstraction.
    (Dylan Thomas (1914-1953), Welsh poet. Quoted in John Malcolm Brinnin, Dylan Thomas in America, ch. 1 (1956).)
    More quotations from: Dylan Thomas, city
  • 45.
    God the first garden made, and the first city Cain.
    (Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British essayist, poet. The Garden, Essays in Verse and Prose (1668).)
    More quotations from: Abraham Cowley, city, god
  • 46.
    What would human life be without forests, those natural cities?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 169, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life
  • 47.
    I see less difference between a city and a swamp than formerly.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, August 9, 1850, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 187, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, city
  • 48.
    If we tire of the saints, Shakspeare is our city of refuge.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Swedenborg; or, the Mystic," Representative Men (1850).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, city
  • 49.
    I hear as good exclamation on your worship as of any man in the city.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 25-6. Mistaking the word, as usual: "exclamation" means outcry against; he perhaps means "acclamation" in speaking to Leonato, governor of Messina.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, city
  • 50.
    We are a most solitary people, and we live, repelled by one another, in the gray, outcast cities of Cain.
    (Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "No Love and No Thanks," Alms for Oblivion (1964).)
    More quotations from: Edward Dahlberg, people
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