Quotations From NICHOLSON BAKER


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  • For me, as a beginning novelist, all other living writers form a control group for whom the world is a placebo.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. U and I, ch. 1, Random House (1991). In contrast to the dead, who "can be helpful, needless to say, but we can only guess sloppily about how they would react to this emergent particle of time, which is all the time we have."

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  • Most good novelists have been women or homosexuals. The novel is the triumphant evolved creation, one increasingly has to think, of these two groups, who have cooperated more closely in this domain than in any other.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. U and I, ch. 7, Random House (1991).

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  • Until a friend or relative has applied a particular proverb to your own life, or until you've watched him apply the proverb to his own life, it has no power to sway you.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. U. And I: A True Story, ch. 4 (1991).

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  • In my case, adulthood itself was not an advance, although it was a useful waymark.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. The Mezzanine, ch. 3 (1988).
  • Shoes are the first adult machines we are given to master.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. The Mezzanine, ch. 2 (1988).
  • Footnotes are the finer-suckered surfaces that allow tentacular paragraphs to hold fast to the wider reality of the library.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. The Mezzanine, footnote to ch. 14 (1988).
  • Updike was the first to take the penile sensorium under the wing of elaborate metaphorical prose.
    Nicholson Baker (b. 1957), U.S. author. U and I, ch. 1, Random House (1991).
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