Quotations From VLADIMIR NABOKOV


» More about Vladimir Nabokov on Poemhunter

 

  • The more gifted and talkative one's characters are, the greater the chances of their resembling the author in tone or tint of mind.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Speak Memory, ch. 10 (1973).
  • Imagination, the supreme delight of the immortal and the immature, should be limited. In order to enjoy life, we should not enjoy it too much.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Speak, Memory, ch. 1, sct. 1 (1955, revised 1966).

    Read more quotations about / on: imagination, life
  • Dostoevski is not a great writer, but a rather mediocre one—with flashes of excellent humor, but, alas, with wastelands of literary platitudes in between.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. "Fyodor Dostoevski," Lectures on Russian Literature (1981). "From the point of view of enduring art and individual genius."

    Read more quotations about / on: humor
  • I want a lump in his throat to obstruct the wisecrack.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Esquire (1969). On being asked what he would like to hear an astronaut say when landing on the moon for the first time.
  • Moreover, the slogan "highbrows and lowbrows, unite!", which he had spouted already, is all wrong since true highbrows are highbrows because they do not unite.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Selected Letters, April 22, 1957 (1989). Rejecting Auden's slogan as a means of defending the right for Lolita to be published.
  • To begin with, let us take the following motto (not especially for this chapter, but generally): Literature is Love. Now we can continue.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Despair, ch. 7 (1966).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • The quality of this novel is the way the plot is treated and not the plot itself.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Selected Letters, Mar. 23, 1935 (1989). Refusing a literary agent who had asked for a synopsis of Glory in order to consider marketing it.
  • All my stories are webs of style and none seems at first blush to contain much kinetic matter.... For me "style" is matter.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Selected Letters, March 17, 1951 (1989). To an editor who objected to an absence of substance in "The Vane Sisters" as grounds for rejecting it.
  • Dear Felix, I have found some work for you. First of all we must have an eye-to-eye monologue and get things settled.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Despair, ch. 4 (1966). Hermann's first letter to Felix.

    Read more quotations about / on: work
  • The novel is not "a crazy quilt of bits"; it is a logical sequence of psychological events: the movements of stars may seem crazy to the simpleton, but wise men know the comets come back.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. Selected Letters, July 14, 1938 (1989). To a literary agent considering The Gift.

    Read more quotations about / on: crazy
[Report Error]