Quotations About / On: LIFE

  • 71.
    so its a new morning, life is not rosy, life is not moon, stars and daffodils, it is not a river dale story, life is brutally dark, life is ugly, life is Bukowskian and now i am loving this darkness
    (a picture and a story)
    More quotations from: Rigzin Namgyal
  • 72.
    helping to keep my self calm and keep stupid thought's out of my head a new life changing act of my life is being changed from the one I am not to be in a mess I am changing my life around is for my self family and my friend's that I have left in my life I lost a lot of self respect and remorse from doing wrong that should not be done or thought of it's nobody's bar for my own so I tuse to live life for the better person than I know I can be a better person in my self and for others to see will be a grateful victory to get back to normality for my kid's is life and work harder to live free from drugs and gain faith this is the life I choose for me my kid's my family and friends and never to turn the clock back and look down but keep our heads high and move forward I will provide prove not words but a strong mind to show you all that thier is strength to be found to keep a m.p.a not just in one person but in all of us positive mental attitude thier is strength in us all to grait a better life and stronger love thier is only to combine or self and be come one in our self
    (Love your self for who you may become)
    More quotations from: dafydd redman
  • 73.
    We make needless ado about capital punishment,—taking lives, when there is no life to take.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1859), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 435, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life
  • 74.
    The pleasure of life is according to the man that lives it, and not according to the work or the place.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, work, life
  • 75.
    "Having reached the term of his natural life"; Mwould it not be truer to say, Having reached the term of his unnatural life?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 178, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life
  • 76.
    Nature and human life are as various as our several constitutions. Who shall say what prospect life offers to another?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 11, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life, nature
  • 77.
    The true preacher can be known by this, that he deals out to the people his life,—life passed through the fire of thought.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Address, July 15, 1838, delivered before the senior class in Divinity College, Cambridge. "The Divinity School Address," repr. in The Portable Emerson, ed. Carl Bode (1946, repr. 1981).)
  • 78.
    A good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
    (John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).)
    More quotations from: John Milton, life
  • 79.
    The word career is a divisive word. It's a word that divides the normal life from business or professional life.
    (Grace Paley (b. 1922), U.S. story writer, poet, and peace activist. As quoted in Listen to Their Voices, ch. 1, by Mickey Pearlman (1993).)
    More quotations from: Grace Paley, life
  • 80.
    The consciousness in each man is a sliding scale, which identifies him now with the First Cause, and now with the flesh of his body; life above life, in infinite degrees.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, life
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