Quotations About / On: MARRIAGE

  • 51.
    The first breath of adultery is the freest; after it, constraints aping marriage develop.
    (John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 5 (1968).)
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  • 52.
    There is more of good nature than of good sense at the bottom of most marriages.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Essay on "Love" in letter, September 1852, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, pp. 199-200, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 53.
    The sweet silent hours of marriage joys.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 330. Trying to persuade Queen Elizabeth that he is a fit suitor for her daughter's hand.)
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  • 54.
    Marriage enlarges the Scene of our Happiness and Miseries.
    (Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 261 (1711).)
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  • 55.
    Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Nekayah, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 26 (1759).)
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  • 56.
    Those marriages generally abound most with love and constancy, that are preceded by a long courtship.
    (Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 261 (1711).)
    More quotations from: Joseph Addison, love
  • 57.
    Not cohabitation but consensus constitutes marriage.
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Ulpianus, Digesta, XL, 9.)
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  • 58.
    A marriage is no amusement but a solemn act, and generally a sad one.
    (Victoria (1819-1901), British monarch, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland. letter, 9 Jan. 1879, to her daughter, Crown Princess Frederick William of Prussia. Quoted in Elizabeth Longford, Victoria R.I., ch. 28 (1964).)
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  • 59.
    Modern marriage has lost its meaning—consequently it is being abolished.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 140, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ, p. 94, trans. by R.J. Hollingdale, Baltimore, Penguin Books (1968). Twilight of the Idols, "Skirmishes of an Untimely Man," section 39 (prepared for publication 1888, published 1889).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, marriage, lost
  • 60.
    So often, as the septuagenarian reflects on life's rewards, we hear that, "in the final analysis" of money, power, prestige, and marriage, fathering alone was what "mattered."
    (Kyle D. Pruett (20th century), professor, child psychiatrist. The Nurturing Father, ch. 15 (1987).)
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