Quotations About / On: MEMORY

  • 61.
    In memory everything seems to happen to music.
    (Tennessee Williams (1914-1983), U.S. dramatist. Tom, in The Glass Menagerie, sc. 1 (1944).)
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  • 62.
    History takes time.... History makes memory.
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. (Written 1932). "A Manoir," Last Operas and Plays, Rinehart (1949).)
  • 63.
    The true art of memory is the art of attention.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 74, Universal Chronicle (London, Sept. 15, 1759).)
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  • 64.
    Memory, the warder of the brain.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 65. "Warder" means watchman.)
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  • 65.
    Tradition is a more interrupted and feebler memory.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 310, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 66.
    Memory ... is the diary that we all carry about with us.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Miss Prism, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 2.)
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  • 67.
    Nothing stands out so conspicuously, or remains so firmly fixed in the memory, as something which you have blundered.
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Oratore, I, 129.)
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  • 68.
    Television, despite its enormous presence, turns out to have added pitifully few lines to the communal memory.
    (Justin Kaplan (b. 1925), U.S. literary historian, biographer, editor. Quoted in Observer (London, June 9, 1991). On editing the 1992 edition of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations.)
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  • 69.
    It seems to me that I have always existed and that I possess memories that date back to the Pharaohs.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by Stratton Buck (1966). Correspondance, letter, September 29, 1866, to George Sand, Conard (1926-1933).)
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  • 70.
    In the man whose childhood has known caresses and kindness, there is always a fibre of memory that can be touched by gentle issues.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (20th century), British novelist. Ed. By Carolyn Warner. The Last Word, ch. 26 (1992).)
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