Quotations About / On: RAVEN

  • 1.
    Volcanoes don't burst because of the raving of ravens.
    (to my students)
  • 2.
    The raven chides blackness.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 211. Proverbial; on Ajax criticizing Achilles for his pride.)
  • 3.
    Could it be that wisdom appears on earth as a raven, drawn by the faint smell of carrion?
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 67, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Twilight of the Idols, "The Problem of Socrates," section 1 (prepared for publication 1888, published 1889).)
  • 4.
    Does wisdom perhaps appear on the earth as a raven which is inspired by the smell of carrion?
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher. "The Problem of Socrates," aph. 1, Twilight of the Idols (1889).)
  • 5.
    You need not explain why or for whom you write. Does the cuckoo or the raven ever explain why it sings? You only need to make a choice between the two.
    (Prasanna Mishra,75, lives in Bhubaneswar (INDIA) . A former Bureaucrat, he is a public policy analyst, active in social media and a benign social activist.)
  • 6.
    The raven is my talisman.... Death is my talisman, Mr. Chapman. The one indestructible force. The one certain thing in an uncertain universe. Death.
    (David Boehm, and Louis Friedlander. Dr. Richard Vollin (Bela Lugosi), The Raven, near the beginning of the movie (1935). Suggested by the Edgar Allan Poe story; the director is better known as Lew Landers.)
  • 7.
    Asceticism is the right way of thinking for those who have to extirpate their sensual drives because they are ravening beasts of prey. But only for those!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 3, p. 234, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Dawn, "Fourth Book," aphorism 331, "Rights and Limits," (1881).)
  • 8.
    In some of those dense fir and spruce woods there is hardly room for the smoke to go up. The trees are a standing night, and every fir and spruce which you fell is a plume plucked from night's raven wing.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 303, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 9.
    "Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven,
    Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
    Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
    Quoth the raven, "Nevermore."
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. The Raven (l. 44-47). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.)
  • 10.
    Not Hermia but Helena I love.
    Who will not change a raven for a dove?
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lysander, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 113-4. Puck's magic juice has made Lysander switch his affections to Helena.)
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