Quotations About / On: ROSE

  • 71.
    As we refine, our checks become finer. If we rise to spiritual culture, the antagonism takes a spiritual form.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, culture
  • 72.
    There is no odor so bad as that which rises from goodness tainted. It is human, it is divine carrion.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 82, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 73.
    The way for a young man to rise, is to improve himself every way he can, never suspecting that any body wishes to hinder him.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to William H. Herndon, July 10, 1848. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1. P. 497, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
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  • 74.
    And then, Sir, there is this consideration, that if the abuse be enormous, Nature will rise up, and claiming her original rights, overturn a corrupt political system.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, July 6, 1763 (1791).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, nature
  • 75.
    The great cry that rises from all our manufacturing cities, louder than the furnace blast, is all in very deed for this—that we manufacture everything there except men.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. 2, ch. 6, para. 16 (1851-1853).)
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  • 76.
    We never exchange more than three words with a Friend in our lives on that level to which our thoughts and feelings almost habitually rise.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 281, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, friend
  • 77.
    My spirits infallibly rise in proportion to the outward dreariness. Give me the ocean, the desert, or the wilderness!
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 228, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, ocean
  • 78.
    The older I get the more I trust in the law according to which the rose and the lily bloom.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Letter, November 9, 1829, to Karl Friedrich Zelter.)
  • 79.
    Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Essays, "Nominalist and Realist," Second Series (1844).)
  • 80.
    It was the supreme expression of the mediocrity of the apparatus that Stalin himself rose to his position.
    (Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), Russian revolutionary. My Life, ch. 40 (1930).)
    More quotations from: Leon Trotsky, rose
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