Quotations About / On: SCHOOL

  • 71.
    We are students of words: we are shut up in schools, and colleges, and recitation-rooms, for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and do not know a thing.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, memory, wind
  • 72.
    It is perhaps the principal admirableness of the Gothic schools of architecture, that they receive the results of the labour of inferior minds; and out of fragments full of imperfection ... raise up a stately and unaccusable whole.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).)
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  • 73.
    I am I because my little dog knows me but, creatively speaking the little dog knowing that you are you and your recognising that he knows, that is what destroys creation. That is what makes school.
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author and patron of the arts; relocated to France. What Are Masterpieces and Why Are There So Few of Them (1936).)
    More quotations from: Gertrude Stein, dog, school
  • 74.
    Some men love only to talk where they are masters. They like to go to school-girls, or to boys, or into the shops where the sauntering people gladly lend an ear.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Clubs," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 75.
    Love should make joy; but our benevolence is unhappy. Our Sunday-schools, and churches, and pauper-societies are yokes to the neck. We pain ourselves to please nobody.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 76.
    They who have been bred in the school of politics fail now and always to face the facts. Their measures are half measures and makeshifts merely. They put off the day of settlement, and meanwhile the debt accumulates.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 388, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, school
  • 77.
    To be a philosopher is not merely to have subtle thoughts, nor even to found a school, but so to love wisdom as to live according to its dictates a life of simplicity, independence, magnanimity, and trust. It is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Economy," Walden (1854).)
  • 78.
    The old saying of Buffon's that style is the man himself is as near the truth as we can get—but then most men mistake grammar for style, as they mistake correct spelling for words or schooling for education.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1903; this remark deleted from first publication by Butler's literary executor, R.A. Streatfield. Ernest Pontifex, or The Way of All Flesh, ch. 2, p. 7, Houghton Mifflin (1964).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, education, truth
  • 79.
    Bodily offspring I do not leave, but mental offspring I do. Well, my books do not have to be sent to school and college, and then insist on going into the church, or take to drinking, or marry their mother's maid.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 153, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, school, leave, mother
  • 80.
    A drunkard would not give money to sober people. He said they would only eat it, and buy clothes and send their children to school with it.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 107, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).)
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