Quotations About / On: SOLDIER

  • 61.
    A nation fights well in proportion to the amount of men and materials it has. And the other equation is that the individual soldier in that army is a more effective soldier the poorer his standard of living has been in the past.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. Gen. Edward Cummings, in The Naked and the Dead, pt. 1, ch. 6, Rinehart (1948). in conversation with Lt. Robert Hearn.)
    More quotations from: Norman Mailer, soldier
  • 62.
    Differences between sad remembrance ceremonies honouring the dead, and government romance parades glorifying war, justifying new wars; remembrance of sad tragic youth soldiers lost serves as a warning, do not enter lightly into conflict zones swift foolish run off to fight wars, saber rattling foolish leaders politicians too soon condemn, new generations of healthy steadfast youth into hellstorm baptism of fire; abstain from war, let children bury parents in natural cycle of life, let not old crippled parents bury their babies as young men as slain blown apart dead.
    (Terence George Craddock 25.4.2015)
  • 63.
    I can take the pain of your absence. I'm soldier and I've been used to being hurt. Even so, it will hurt me.
    (I was missing a lady friend I was in love with when I said this.)
    More quotations from: Yehoshua Shim'onai
  • 64.
    Wars will remain while human nature remains. I believe in my soul in cooperation, in arbitration; but the soldier's occupation we cannot say is gone until human nature is gone.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. IV, pp. 592-593, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Diary (August 11, 1890).)
  • 65.
    Einstein is not ... merely an artist in his moments of leisure and play, as a great statesman may play golf or a great soldier grow orchids. He retains the same attitude in the whole of his work. He traces science to its roots in emotion, which is exactly where art is also rooted.
    (Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 3 (1923).)
    More quotations from: Havelock Ellis, golf, soldier, work
  • 66.
    Civil servants and priests, soldiers and ballet-dancers, schoolmasters and police constables, Greek museums and Gothic steeples, civil list and services list—the common seed within which all these fabulous beings slumber in embryo is taxation.
    (Karl Marx (1818-1883), German political theorist, social philosopher. repr. In Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels: Collected Works, vol. 6 (1976). Moralizing Criticism and Critical Morality (1847).)
    More quotations from: Karl Marx
  • 67.
    The feeling about a soldier is, when all is said and done, he wasn't really going to do very much with his life anyway. The example usually is: "he wasn't going to compose Beethoven's Fifth."
    (Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (b. 1922), U.S. novelist. City Limits (London, March 11, 1983).)
    More quotations from: Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., soldier, life
  • 68.
    What makes a regiment of soldiers a more noble object of view than the same mass of mob? Their arms, their dresses, their banners, and the art and artificial symmetry of their position and movements.
    (George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Letter, February 7, 1821, to publisher John Murray.)
    More quotations from: George Gordon Noel Byron
  • 69.
    The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it NOW deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.
    (Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. First published in Pennsylvania Journal (December 19, 1776). Introduction to the first of a series of pamphlets entitled "The American Crisis," (December 23, 1776). George Washington ordered this paper to be read to his troops, December 26, 1776, on the eve of the Battle of Trenton, New Jersey.)
  • 70.
    If our soldiers are not overburdened with money, it is not because they have a distaste for riches; if their lives are not unduly long, it is not because they are disinclined to longevity.
    (Sun Tzu (6-5th century B.C.), Chinese general. Ed. James Clavell (1981). The Art of War, ch. 11, axiom 27 (c. 490 B.C.).)
    More quotations from: Sun Tzu, money
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