Raymond Chandler


Raymond Chandler Quotes

  • ''It is pretty obvious that the debasement of the human mind caused by a constant flow of fraudulent advertising is no trivial thing. There is more than one way to conquer a country.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. Letter, November 15, 1951, to his New York literary agent Carl Brandt. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
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  • ''It is just possible that the tensions in a novel of murder are the simplest and yet most complete pattern of the tensions on which we live in this generation.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. letter, Oct. 17, 1948, to critic James Sandoe. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''They don't want you until you have made a name, and by the time you have made a name, you have developed some kind of talent they can't use. All they will do is spoil it, if you let them.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. Letter, November 7, 1951, to editor Dale Warren. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''A good story cannot be devised; it has to be distilled.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. Letter, March 7, 1947. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''If my books had been any worse, I should not have been invited to Hollywood, and ... if they had been any better, I should not have come.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. letter, Dec. 12, 1945, Atlantic Monthly (Boston). Raymond Chandler Speaking, eds. Dorothy Gardiner and Katherine S. Walker (1962). To Atlantic Monthly editor, Charles W. Morton, responding to criticism of Chandler's article Writers in Hollywood.
  • ''I am ... by tradition and long study a complete snob. P. Marlowe and I do not despise the upper classes because they take baths and have money; we despise them because they are phony.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. letter, Jan. 7, 1945, to editor Dale Warren. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''Your rat tail is all the fashion now. I prefer a bushy plume, carried straight up. You are Siamese and your ancestors lived in trees. Mine lived in palaces. It has been suggested to me that I am a bit of a snob. How true! I prefer to be.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. letter, Christmas 1948, from Chandler's cat Taki to Mike Gibbud, Esq., "A Siamese Cat of imperfect blood line." Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''I said something which gave you to think I hated cats. But gad, sir, I am one of the most fanatical cat lovers in the business. If you hate them, I may learn to hate you. If your allergies hate them, I will tolerate the situation to the best of my ability.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. letter, Jan. 26, 1950, to publisher Hamish Hamilton. Raymond Chandler Speaking (1962).
  • ''The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. Sewell Endicott, in The Long Goodbye, ch. 8 (1953).
  • ''Alcohol is like love. The first kiss is magic, the second is intimate, the third is routine. After that you take the girl's clothes off.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. Terry Lennox, in The Long Goodbye, ch. 4 (1954).

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Best Poem of Raymond Chandler

The Unknown Love

When the evening sun is slanting,
When the crickets raise their chanting,
And the dewdrops lie a-twinkling on the grass,
As I climb the pathway slowly,
With a mien half proud, half lowly,
O'er the ground your feet have trod I gently pass.

Round the empty house I wander,
Where the ivy now is fonder
Of your memory than those long gone away;
And I feel a sweet affection
For the plant that lends protection
To the window whence you looked on me that day.

Was it love or recognition,
When you stormed my weak position
And made prisoner my heart for ...

Read the full of The Unknown Love

The Unknown Love

When the evening sun is slanting,
When the crickets raise their chanting,
And the dewdrops lie a-twinkling on the grass,
As I climb the pathway slowly,
With a mien half proud, half lowly,
O'er the ground your feet have trod I gently pass.

Round the empty house I wander,
Where the ivy now is fonder

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