Raymond Chandler


Raymond Chandler Quotes

  • ''The kind of lawyer you hope the other fellow has.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. The Long Goodbye, ch. 17 (1954).
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  • ''The English may not always be the best writers in the world, but they are incomparably the best dull writers.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. First published in Atlantic Monthly (Boston, December 1944). The Simple Art of Murder (1950).
  • ''It is not funny that a man should be killed, but it is sometimes funny that he should be killed for so little, and that his death should be the coin of what we call civilization.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. The Simple Art of Murder, Atlantic Monthly, Boston (Dec. 1944, repr. 1950).
  • ''The boys with their feet on the desks know that the easiest murder case in the world to break is the one somebody tried to get very cute with; the one that really bothers them is the murder somebody only thought of two minutes before he pulled it off.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "The Simple Art of Murder," Atlantic Monthly (Boston, Dec. 1944, repr. 1950).
  • ''The perfect detective story cannot be written. The type of mind which can evolve the perfect problem is not the type of mind that can produce the artistic job of writing.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "Twelve Notes on the Mystery Story," The Notebooks of Raymond Chandler (1976).
  • ''Some are able and humane men and some are low-grade individuals with the morals of a goat, the artistic integrity of a slot machine, and the manners of a floorwalker with delusions of grandeur.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "Writers in Hollywood," Atlantic Monthly (Boston, November 1945). On movie producers.
  • ''The making of a picture ought surely to be a rather fascinating adventure. It is not; it is an endless contention of tawdry egos, some of them powerful, almost all of them vociferous, and almost none of them capable of anything much more creative than credit-stealing and self- promotion.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "Writers in Hollywood," Atlantic Monthly (Boston, Nov. 1945).
  • ''The challenge of screenwriting is to say much in little and then take half of that little out and still preserve an effect of leisure and natural movement.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "Writers in Hollywood," Atlantic Monthly (Boston, Nov. 1945).
  • ''The keynote of American civilization is a sort of warm-hearted vulgarity. The Americans have none of the irony of the English, none of their cool poise, none of their manner. But they do have friendliness. Where an Englishman would give you his card, an American would very likely give you his shirt.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. author. "Beginning of an Essay," The Notebooks of Raymond Chandler (1976).
  • ''What is a life or two, Guy! Some people are better off dead. Like your wife and my father, for instance.''
    Raymond Chandler (1888-1959), U.S. screenwriter, Czenzi Ormonde, and Alfred Hitchcock. Bruno Antony (Robert Walker), Strangers on a Train, proposing a plot to swap murders (1951). Adaptation by Whitfield Cooke from the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

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Best Poem of Raymond Chandler

The Unknown Love

When the evening sun is slanting,
When the crickets raise their chanting,
And the dewdrops lie a-twinkling on the grass,
As I climb the pathway slowly,
With a mien half proud, half lowly,
O'er the ground your feet have trod I gently pass.

Round the empty house I wander,
Where the ivy now is fonder
Of your memory than those long gone away;
And I feel a sweet affection
For the plant that lends protection
To the window whence you looked on me that day.

Was it love or recognition,
When you stormed my weak position
And made prisoner my heart for ...

Read the full of The Unknown Love

The Unknown Love

When the evening sun is slanting,
When the crickets raise their chanting,
And the dewdrops lie a-twinkling on the grass,
As I climb the pathway slowly,
With a mien half proud, half lowly,
O'er the ground your feet have trod I gently pass.

Round the empty house I wander,
Where the ivy now is fonder

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