Richard Brinsley Sheridan

(1751 - 1816 / Ireland)

Richard Brinsley Sheridan Quotes

  • '''Tis safest in matrimony to begin with a little aversion.''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Mrs. Malaprop, in The Rivals, act 1, sc. 2 (1775).
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  • ''Illiterate him, I say, quite from your memory.... There is nothing on earth so easy as to forget, if a person chooses to set about it. I'm sure I have as much forgot your poor, dear uncle, as if he had never existed—and I thought it my duty to do so.''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Mrs. Malaprop, in The Rivals, act 1, sc. 2 (1775). The first appearance of Mrs. Malaprop in the play, which is peppered with her "malapropisms." Her name is from the French, mal à propos, or "inappropriate."
  • ''He is the very pineapple of politeness!''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Mrs. Malaprop, in The Rivals, act 3, sc. 3 (1775). Referring to Captain Absolute; the word intended in the "malapropism" is pinnacle.
  • ''There is nothing on earth so easy as to forget, if a person chooses to set about it. I'm sure I have as much forgot your poor, dear uncle, as if he had never existed; and I thought it my duty to do so.''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Mrs. Malaprop, in The Rivals, act 1, sc. 2.
  • ''Sure if I reprehend anything in this world, it is the use of my oracular tongue, and a nice derangement of epitaphs.''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Mrs. Malaprop, in The Rivals, act 3, sc. 3 (1775). A "correct" version of this "malapropism" might be: "If I apprehend anything in this world, it is the use of my vernacular tongue, and a nice arrangement of epithets."
  • ''I open with a clock striking, to beget an awful attention in the audience—it also marks the time, which is four o'clock in the morning, and saves a description of the rising sun, and a great deal about gilding the eastern hemisphere.''
    Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816), Anglo-Irish dramatist. Puff, in The Critic, act 2, sc. 2.

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Best Poem of Richard Brinsley Sheridan

If A Daughter You Have

If a daughter you have, she's the plague of your life,
No peace shall you know, tho' you've buried your wife,
At twenty she mocks at the duty you taught her,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.
Sighing and whining,
Dying and pining,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.

When scarce in their teens, they have wit to perplex us,
With letters and lovers for ever they vex us,
While each still rejects the fair suitor you've brought her,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.
Wrangling and jangling,
Flouting and pouting,
O, what a plague is ...

Read the full of If A Daughter You Have

If A Daughter You Have

If a daughter you have, she's the plague of your life,
No peace shall you know, tho' you've buried your wife,
At twenty she mocks at the duty you taught her,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.
Sighing and whining,
Dying and pining,
O, what a plague is an obstinate daughter.

When scarce in their teens, they have wit to perplex us,

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