Richard Steele


Richard Steele Quotes

  • ''I have always observed that Women, whether out of a nicer Regard to their Honour, or what other Reason I cannot tell, are more sensibly touched with those general Aspersions which are cast upon their Sex, than Men are by what is said of theirs.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 11 (1711).
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  • ''He is one of those that deserve very well, but are very awkward at putting their Talents within the Observation of such as should take Notice of them.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Spectator, No. 2 (1711).
  • ''The Virtues have respectively a Masculine and a Feminine Cast. What we call in Men Wisdom, is in Woman Prudence.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 172 (1710).
  • ''I sat by an eminent Storyteller and Politician who takes half an Ounce in five Seconds, and has mortgaged a pretty Tenement near the Town, meerly [sic] to improve and dung his Brains with this prolifick Powder.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 35 (1709). From an essay on taking snuff, the popular gentleman's drug consisting of a preparation of powdered tobacco.
  • ''A Man who always acts in the Severity of Wisdom, or the Haughtiness of Quality, seems to move in a personated Part: It looks too Constrained and Theatrical for a Man to be always in that Character which distinguishes him from others.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 112 (1709).
  • ''[I]f a Fine Lady thinks fit to giggle at Church, or a Great Beau come in drunk to a Play, either shall be sure to hear of it in my ensuing Paper: For merely as a well-bred Man, I cannot bear these Enormities.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 3 (1709). Spoken by Isaac Bickerstaff, the narrative persona of The Tatler.
  • ''I look upon it as a Point of Morality, to be obliged by those who endeavour to oblige me.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 132 (1709).
  • ''There is no Pleasure like that of receiving Praise from the Praiseworthy.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 89 (1709).
  • ''The Mind in Infancy is, methinks, like the Body in Embrio, and receives Impressions so forcible, that they are as hard to be removed by Reason, as any Mark with which a Child is born is to be taken away by any future Application.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. The Tatler, No. 181 (1710).
  • ''The insupportable labour of doing nothing.''
    Richard Steele (1672-1729), British dramatist, essayist, editor. The Tatler (London, Aug. 1709), no. 54.

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Best Poem of Richard Steele

'My Angel'

Before you came into my life, I was struggling and going through strife.

I did not feel like I could go on, I no longer felt strong.

But then you came, soaring into my heart as an angel without wings.

I am glad that you are so much a part, of my life.

you helped me when depression cut me like a knife.

You are my miracle, and I am so grateful for a wonderful gift in my life.

In the future, I can see eternity, you and I as husband and wife.

Baby you are.....

My Angel, my miracle, The Queen of my heart.

...

Read the full of 'My Angel'

'My Angel'

Before you came into my life, I was struggling and going through strife.

I did not feel like I could go on, I no longer felt strong.

But then you came, soaring into my heart as an angel without wings.

I am glad that you are so much a part, of my life.

you helped me when depression cut me like a knife.

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