Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Robert Frost Quotes

  • ''So she looked for herself, as everyone
    Looks for himself, more or less outwardly.''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Maple."
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  • ''They were pipes of pagan mirth,
    And the world had found new terms of worth.
    He laid him down on the sunburned earth
    And raveled a flower and looked away.
    Play? Play? What should he play?''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Pan With Us."
  • ''These doorsteps seldom have a visitor.
    The warping boards pull out their own old nails
    With none to tread and put them in their place.''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "The Black Cottage."
  • ''There was an old, old house renewed with paint,
    And in it a piano loudly playing.''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "The Investment."
  • ''She had to lean away.
    She dared not stir a foot,
    Lest movement should provoke
    The demon of pursuit
    That slumbers in a brute.''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. The Subverted Flower (l. 30-34). . . The Poetry of Robert Frost. Edward Connery Lathem, ed. (1979) Henry Holt.
  • ''Satan, what ails you? Where's the famous tongue?
    Thou onetime Prince of Conversationists?''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "A Masque of Reason."
  • ''For Thought has a pair of dauntless wings.''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Bond and Free."
  • ''This saying good-by on the edge of the dark
    And the cold to an orchard so young in the bark
    Reminds me of all that can happen to harm
    An orchard away at the end of the farm....''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Good-by and Keep Cold."
  • ''Her teacher's certainty it must be Mabel
    Made Maple first take notice of her name.
    She asked her father and he told her, "Maple
    Maple is right."''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Maple."
  • ''No one was anxious to get rid of Paul.
    He'd been the hero of the mountain camps
    Ever since, just to show them, he had slipped
    The bark of a whole tamarack off whole....''
    Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "Paul's Wife."

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Best Poem of Robert Frost

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come ...

Read the full of The Road Not Taken

Out, Out

The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.

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