Robert Louis Stevenson

(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Robert Louis Stevenson Poems

201. Block City 1/3/2003
202. Ad Olum 12/31/2002
203. Romance 1/4/2003
204. Since Thou Hast Given Me This Good Hope, O God 12/31/2002
205. Good And Bad Children 1/3/2003
206. Travel 1/3/2003
207. When The Sun Come After Rain 12/31/2002
208. About The Sheltered Garden Ground 12/31/2002
209. Where Go The Boats? 1/3/2003
210. Winter-Time 1/3/2003
211. Away With Funeral Music 12/31/2002
212. An English Breeze 12/31/2002
213. The Land Of Nod 1/3/2003
214. As One Who Having Wandered All Night Long 12/31/2002
215. The Cow 1/3/2003
216. Foreign Lands 1/3/2003
217. Armies In The Fire 1/3/2003
218. Flower God, God Of The Spring 12/31/2002
219. At The Sea-Side 1/3/2003
220. The Vagabond 1/3/2003
221. Autumn Fires 1/3/2003
222. A Good Play 1/3/2003
223. Windy Nights 1/3/2003
224. The Land Of Counterpane 1/3/2003
225. The Lamplighter 1/3/2003
226. Bed In Summer 1/3/2003
227. The Moon 1/3/2003
228. A Valentine's Song 12/31/2002
229. The Wind 1/3/2003
230. A Thought 1/3/2003
231. At Last She Comes 12/31/2002
232. My Shadow 12/31/2002
233. From A Railway Carriage 1/3/2003
234. Rain 1/3/2003
235. Requiem 1/3/2003
236. Summer Sun 1/3/2003
237. A Good Boy 1/3/2003
238. Love, What Is Love 12/31/2002
239. The Swing 1/3/2003

Comments about Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Konigan Barrutman Konigan Barrutman (10/3/2014 1:30:00 PM)

    It is right to see such a gentle man look harsh, because he has trodden down and known so much of a harsh world in order to command that visage in life. A goodly poet

    58 person liked.
    31 person did not like.
  • Lil Dietz (1/28/2014 8:47:00 PM)

    When I was 8, my grandparents gave me for Christmas, A Child's Garden of Verses, my first poetry book. I adored it and still have it on my bookshelf. I remember that when I read it, it seemed dreamlike and peaceful... I had a happy feeling. How odd, I think, looking back on it, that a child so young would like poetry? Later on in childhood I read Shel Silverstein's popular poetry books but they were much more, hit-you-over-the-head with silliness, while this book was more intelligent and wry. For example, The Whole Duty of Children, : A child should always say what's true, And speak when he is spoken to, And behave mannerly at the table, At least as far as he is able, which is accompanied by a drawing of a child asleep sitting before his half-eaten meal with his head on the table.

  • Iris Shih (4/15/2012 3:42:00 AM)

    There are a lot of my poems including the elements of rhymes, bits... what's more, fairy tale elements of a child's heart. Welcome.

  • Iris Shih (4/15/2012 3:40:00 AM)

    Comment about your poem Love

    Despair - What is despair?
    After lots of ups and downs – first you deny, then you realize, finally... you have to believe
    What wins? is … the one who departs first
    Who loses? is … the one who loves more and insists not to go
    What if …?
    Everything is just a game and tact?

  • Bernard Onoja (8/14/2011 11:32:00 PM)

    Robert is a poet per excellence.His style is simply but strikes the audience with precision. I would be honored if he can appraise my poems, i would be encouraged by his criticism

  • James Marcum (5/3/2011 11:57:00 AM)

    When I was a very young boy in school I was given a book of poetry written by Robert Louis Stevenson...one of his poems has stuck with me all these years, 'The Land of Counterpane.' When I was ill and bed fast I would play with my toys among the bed-clothes. I guess most every young person has experienced this....

Best Poem of Robert Louis Stevenson

The Swing

How do you like to go up in a swing,
Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
Ever a child can do!

Up in the air and over the wall,
Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
Over the countryside--

Till I look down on the garden green,
Down on the roof so brown--
Up in the air I go flying again,
Up in the air and down!

Read the full of The Swing

In Lupum

BEYOND the gates thou gav'st a field to till;
I have a larger on my window-sill.
A farm, d'ye say? Is this a farm to you,
Where for all woods I spay one tuft of rue,
And that so rusty, and so small a thing,
One shrill cicada hides it with a wing;
Where one cucumber covers all the plain;
And where one serpent rings himself in vain
To enter wholly; and a single snail

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