Rudyard Kipling

(30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936 / Bombay)

Rudyard Kipling Poems

321. Cruisers 1/3/2003
322. Screw-Guns 12/31/2002
323. The Centaurs 1/3/2003
324. With Scindia To Delhi 12/31/2002
325. The Answer 12/31/2002
326. Azrael's Count 12/31/2002
327. The Wage-Slaves 12/31/2002
328. Merrow Down 1/3/2003
329. For To Admire 12/31/2002
330. Belts 12/31/2002
331. Gallio's Song 1/3/2003
332. Red Dog 1/3/2003
333. Columns 1/3/2003
334. At His Execution 12/31/2002
335. Many Inventions 1/3/2003
336. The Betrothed 12/31/2002
337. Pharaoh And The Sergeant 1/3/2003
338. The Disciple 1/3/2003
339. Gertrude's Prayer 1/3/2003
340. Dedication 1/3/2003
341. La Nuit Blanche 1/3/2003
342. Two Kopjes 12/31/2002
343. Lukannon 1/3/2003
344. Quiquern 1/3/2003
345. The Widow At Windsor 12/31/2002
346. Ballad Of Fisher's Boarding-House 1/3/2003
347. Covenant 1/3/2003
348. Dinah In Heaven 1/3/2003
349. The Law Of The Jungle 1/3/2003
350. Rimini 1/3/2003
351. Municipal 1/3/2003
352. Helen All Alone 1/3/2003
353. The Two-Sided Man 12/31/2002
354. Army Headquarters 12/31/2002
355. A Song Of The English 12/31/2002
356. Romulus And Remus 1/3/2003
357. Ulster 12/31/2002
358. The Story Of Uriah 12/31/2002
359. Brookland Road 1/3/2003
360. The Mother's Son 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Rudyard Kipling

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream- -and not make dreams your master;
If you can think- -and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the ...

Read the full of If

Quiquern

The People of the Eastern Ice, they are melting like the snow--
They beg for coffee and sugar; they go where the white men go.
The People of the Western Ice, they learn to steal and fight;
They sell their furs to the trading-post; they sell their souls to
the white.
The People of the Southern Ice, they trade with the whaler's
crew;
Their women have many ribbons, but their tents are torn and few.
But the People of the Elder Ice, beyond the white man's ken--

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