Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''Words are not as satisfactory as we should like them to be, but, like our neighbours, we have got to live with them and must make the best and not the worst of them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).
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  • ''The history of the world is the record of the weakness, frailty and death of public opinion.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. "Pictures and Books," Notebooks (1912).
  • ''We all like to forgive, and love best not those who offend us least, nor who have done most for us, but those who make it most easy for us to forgive them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 236 (1951).
  • ''I never knew a writer yet who took the smallest pains with his style and was at the same time readable.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 290, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''All progress is based upon a universal innate desire on the part of every organism to live beyond its income.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, ch. 1 (1912).
  • ''The three most important things a man has are, briefly, his private parts, his money, and his religious opinions.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, "Untraced Notes," (1951).
  • ''Truth: It should not be absolutely lost sight of but it should not be talked about.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 253, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Is life worth living? This is a question for an embryo, not for a man.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).
  • ''People care more about being thought to have taste than about being thought either good, clever or amiable.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).
  • ''The oldest books are still only just out to those who have not read them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 266 (1951).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

The Metaphysical Sectarian

HE was in Logick a great Critick,
Profoundly skill'd in Analytick.
He could distinguish, and divide
A Hair 'twixt South and South-West side:
On either which he would dispute,
Confute, change hands, and still confute.
He'd undertake to prove by force
Of Argument, a Man's no Horse.
He'd prove a Buzard is no Fowl,
And that a Lord may be an Owl;
A Calf an Alderman, a Goose a Justice,
And Rooks Committee-men and Trustees.
He'd run in Debt by Disputation,
And pay with Ratiocination.
All this by Syllogism, true
In Mood and Figure, he would ...

Read the full of The Metaphysical Sectarian

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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