Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''To live is like to love—all reason is against it, and all healthy instinct for it.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 283, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''Truth does not consist in never lying but in knowing when to lie and when not to do so.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 304, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Man is a jelly which quivers so much as to run about.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 129, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Our minds want clothes as much as our bodies.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 201, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''A man should be just cultured enough to be able to look with suspicion upon culture at first, not second hand.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 88 (1951).
  • ''Any fool can tell the truth, but it requires a man of some sense to know how to lie well.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 114, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''I believe that he was really sorry that people would not believe he was sorry that he was not more sorry.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 193 (1951).
  • ''The most important service rendered by the press and the magazines is that of educating people to approach printed matter with distrust.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 221, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Opinions have vested interests just as men have.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 221 (1951).
  • ''Let us eat and drink neither forgetting death unduly nor remembering it. The Lord hath mercy on whom he will have mercy, etc., and the less we think about it the better.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 295, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

The Metaphysical Sectarian

HE was in Logick a great Critick,
Profoundly skill'd in Analytick.
He could distinguish, and divide
A Hair 'twixt South and South-West side:
On either which he would dispute,
Confute, change hands, and still confute.
He'd undertake to prove by force
Of Argument, a Man's no Horse.
He'd prove a Buzard is no Fowl,
And that a Lord may be an Owl;
A Calf an Alderman, a Goose a Justice,
And Rooks Committee-men and Trustees.
He'd run in Debt by Disputation,
And pay with Ratiocination.
All this by Syllogism, true
In Mood and Figure, he would ...

Read the full of The Metaphysical Sectarian

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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