Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''My main wish is to get my books into other people's rooms, and to keep other people's books out of mine.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 89, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''Sight and all the other senses are only modes of touch.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 83, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Not to over-breed will be one day recognized as not less essential for national well- being than breeding is.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 281, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''In old times people used to try and square the circle; now they try and devise schemes for satisfying the Irish nation.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 260, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Letters are like wine; if they are sound they ripen with keeping. A man should lay down letters as he does a cellar of wine.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 275, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The want of money is the root of all evil.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 310 (1951). The aphorism, which has also been credited to Mark Twain, reappeared in Butler's novel, Erewhon, ch. 20 (1872).
  • ''A man may begin as a bad sound, or even as a bad echo, but he is to be distrusted if he begins as a good echo.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 16, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Priests are not men of the world; it is not intended that they should be; and a University training is the one best adapted to prevent their becoming so.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 271, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The little Strangs say the "good words," as they call them, before going to bed, aloud and at their father's knee, or rather in the pit of his stomach. One of them was lately heard to say "Forgive us our christmasses as we forgive them that christmas against us."''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 274, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The youth of an art is, like the youth of anything else, its most interesting period. When it has come to the knowledge of good and evil it is stronger, but we care less about it.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 275 (1951).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

THE ARGUMENT

Sir Hudibras his passing worth,
The manner how he sallied forth;
His arms and equipage are shown;
His horse's virtues, and his own.
Th' adventure of the bear and fiddle
Is sung, but breaks off in the middle.


When civil dudgeon a first grew high,
And men fell out they knew not why?
When hard words, jealousies, and fears,
Set folks together by the ears,
And made them fight, like mad or drunk,
For Dame Religion, as for punk;
Whose honesty they all durst swear for,
Though not a man of them knew wherefore:
When Gospel-Trumpeter, ...

Read the full of Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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