Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''We can only proselytize fresh meat, putrid meat begins to have strong convictions of its own.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 70, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''I do not mind lying, but I hate inaccuracy.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Truth and Convenience: Falsehood," (1912).
  • ''Work with some men is as besetting a sin as idleness.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks (1951).
  • ''Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Life," (1912).
  • ''If there could be such a thing as the Mammon of Righteousness Christina would have assuredly made friends with it.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1903. Ernest Pontifex, or The Way of All Flesh, ch. 12, p. 48, Houghton Mifflin (1964).
  • ''One's stomach is one's internal environment.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, page 112, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''It is our less conscious thoughts and our less conscious actions which mainly mould our lives and the lives of those who spring from us.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 5 (1903).
  • ''Men should not try to overstrain their goodness more than any other faculty, bodily or mental.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 195, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''An empty house is like a stray dog or a body from which life has departed.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 72 (1903).
  • ''Death is only a larger kind of going abroad.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 144, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

The Metaphysical Sectarian

HE was in Logick a great Critick,
Profoundly skill'd in Analytick.
He could distinguish, and divide
A Hair 'twixt South and South-West side:
On either which he would dispute,
Confute, change hands, and still confute.
He'd undertake to prove by force
Of Argument, a Man's no Horse.
He'd prove a Buzard is no Fowl,
And that a Lord may be an Owl;
A Calf an Alderman, a Goose a Justice,
And Rooks Committee-men and Trustees.
He'd run in Debt by Disputation,
And pay with Ratiocination.
All this by Syllogism, true
In Mood and Figure, he would ...

Read the full of The Metaphysical Sectarian

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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