Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''It is not he who gains the exact point in dispute who scores most in controversy—but he who has shown the better temper.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 112 (1951).
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  • ''How holy people look when they are sea-sick!''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. "Written Sketches," Notebooks (1912).
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  • ''Providence itself could not be more absolutely improvident.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 108, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''Those who have never had a father can at any rate never know the sweets of losing one. To most men the death of his father is a new lease of life.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 100 (1951).
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  • ''Never have anything to do with the near surviving representatives of anyone whose name appears in the death column of the Times as having "passed away."''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 249, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''There are more fools than knaves in the world, else the knaves would not have enough to live upon.''
    Samuel Butler (1612-1680), British poet. Genuine Remains in Verse and Prose, vol. 2 (1759).
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  • ''Books are like imprisoned souls till someone takes them down from a shelf and frees them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 248, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''For every why he had a wherefore.''
    Samuel Butler (1612-1680), British poet. eds. John Wilders and Hugh de Quehen (1973). Hudibras, pt. 1, cto. 1, l. 132 (1663).
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  • ''Bodily offspring I do not leave, but mental offspring I do. Well, my books do not have to be sent to school and college, and then insist on going into the church, or take to drinking, or marry their mother's maid.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 153, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''Habitual Teetotallers: There should be asylums for such people. But they would probably relapse into teetotalism as soon as they came out.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 79, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

THE ARGUMENT

Sir Hudibras his passing worth,
The manner how he sallied forth;
His arms and equipage are shown;
His horse's virtues, and his own.
Th' adventure of the bear and fiddle
Is sung, but breaks off in the middle.


When civil dudgeon a first grew high,
And men fell out they knew not why?
When hard words, jealousies, and fears,
Set folks together by the ears,
And made them fight, like mad or drunk,
For Dame Religion, as for punk;
Whose honesty they all durst swear for,
Though not a man of them knew wherefore:
When Gospel-Trumpeter, ...

Read the full of Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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