Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''The only living works are those which have drained much of the author's own life into them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 194 (1951).
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  • ''Academic and aristocratic people live in such an uncommon atmosphere that common sense can rarely reach them.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 249, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''To know is to know the things belonging to one's peace.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 195, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Our ideas are for the most part like bad sixpences, and we spend our lives trying to pass them on one another.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 60, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Life is like playing a violin solo in public and learning the instrument as one goes on.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. speech, Feb. 27, 1895, Somerville Club, London. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 310 (1951).
  • ''The healthy stomach is nothing if it is not conservative. Few radicals have good digestions.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 90 (1951).
  • ''A genius can never expect to have a good time anywhere, if he is a genuine article, but America is about the last place in which life will be endurable at all for an inspired writer of any kind.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 257 (1951).
  • ''The sinews of art and literature, like those of war, are money.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 160, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''We shall never get people whose time is money to take much interest in atoms.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 133, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The seven deadly sins: Want of money, bad health, bad temper, chastity, family ties, knowing that you know things, and believing in the Christian religion.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 115, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

The Metaphysical Sectarian

HE was in Logick a great Critick,
Profoundly skill'd in Analytick.
He could distinguish, and divide
A Hair 'twixt South and South-West side:
On either which he would dispute,
Confute, change hands, and still confute.
He'd undertake to prove by force
Of Argument, a Man's no Horse.
He'd prove a Buzard is no Fowl,
And that a Lord may be an Owl;
A Calf an Alderman, a Goose a Justice,
And Rooks Committee-men and Trustees.
He'd run in Debt by Disputation,
And pay with Ratiocination.
All this by Syllogism, true
In Mood and Figure, he would ...

Read the full of The Metaphysical Sectarian

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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