Samuel Butler

(1612 - 1680 / England)

Samuel Butler Quotes

  • ''Silence and tact may or may not be the same thing.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 240, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
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  • ''People are lucky and unlucky not according to what they get absolutely, but according to the ratio between what they get and what they have been led to expect.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 197, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The body is but a pair of pincers set over a bellows and a stewpan and the whole fixed upon stilts.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 289, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''A drunkard would not give money to sober people. He said they would only eat it, and buy clothes and send their children to school with it.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 107, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''When the water of a place is bad it is safest to drink none that has not been filtered through either the berry of a grape, or else a tub of malt. These are the most reliable filters yet invented.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 255 (1951).
  • ''Entertaining angels unawares: It is always we who are to entertain the angels, and never they us. I cannot, however, think that an angel would be a very entertaining person, either as guest or host.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 154, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''To himself every one is an immortal. He may know that he is going to die, but he can never know that he is dead.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 117 (1951).
  • ''In the midst of vice we are in virtue, and vice versa.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 279, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''Women can stand a beating except when it is with their own weapons.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 266, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).
  • ''The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too.''
    Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Notebooks, "Higgledy-Piggledy," (1912).

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Best Poem of Samuel Butler

Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

THE ARGUMENT

Sir Hudibras his passing worth,
The manner how he sallied forth;
His arms and equipage are shown;
His horse's virtues, and his own.
Th' adventure of the bear and fiddle
Is sung, but breaks off in the middle.


When civil dudgeon a first grew high,
And men fell out they knew not why?
When hard words, jealousies, and fears,
Set folks together by the ears,
And made them fight, like mad or drunk,
For Dame Religion, as for punk;
Whose honesty they all durst swear for,
Though not a man of them knew wherefore:
When Gospel-Trumpeter, ...

Read the full of Hudibras: Part 1 - Canto I

Sonnets On Miss Savage

i
She was too kind, wooed too persistently,
Wrote moving letters to me day by day;
The more she wrote, the more unmoved was I,
The more she gave, the less could I repay.
Therefore I grieve, not that I was not loved,
But that, being loved, I could not love again.
I liked, but like and love are far removed;
Hard though I tried to love I tried in vain.

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