Samuel Johnson

(1709 - 1784 / Lichfield / England)

Samuel Johnson Quotes

  • ''Now ... that you are going to marry, do not expect more from life, than life will afford."''
    Samuel Johnson (1704-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, Nov. 10, 1769, p. 430, Oxford University Press (1980). Said to Boswell.
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  • ''Sir John, Sir, is a very unclubbable man.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, spring 1764 (1791). Referring to eminent musicologist Sir John Hawkins. He was Johnson's literary executor and published an inaccurate Life (1787-1789) and an edition of Johnson's works.
  • ''Almost all absurdity of conduct arises from the imitation of those whom we cannot resemble.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 4, eds. W.J. Bate and Albrecht B. Strauss (1969). Rambler (London, July 2, 1751), no. 135.
  • ''I deny the lawfulness of telling a lie to a sick man for fear of alarming him. You have no business with consequences; you are to tell the truth.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, June 13, 1784, pp. 1301-02, Oxford University Press (1980).
  • ''No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, April 5, 1776 (1791).
  • ''I gleaned jests at home from obsolete farces.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Rambler (London, July 23, 1751), no. 141.
  • ''In lapidary inscriptions a man is not upon oath.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, 1775 (1791).

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Best Poem of Samuel Johnson

On The Death Of Mr. Robert Levet, A Practiser In Physic

CONDEMN'D to Hope's delusive mine,
As on we toil from day to day,
By sudden blasts or slow decline
Our social comforts drop away.

Well tried through many a varying year,
See Levet to the grave descend,
Officious, innocent, sincere,
Of every friendless name the friend.

Yet still he fills affection's eye,
Obscurely wise and coarsely kind;
Nor, letter'd Arrogance, deny
Thy praise to merit unrefined.

When fainting nature call'd for aid,
And hov'ring death prepared the blow,
His vig'rous remedy display'd
The power of art without the ...

Read the full of On The Death Of Mr. Robert Levet, A Practiser In Physic

Autumn

Alas! with swift and silent pace,
Impatient time rolls on the year;
The Seasons change, and Nature's face
Now sweetly smiles, now frowns severe.

'Twas Spring, 'twas Summer, all was gay,
Now Autumn bends a cloudy brow;
The flowers of Spring are swept away,
And Summer fruits desert the bough.

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