Samuel Johnson

(1709 - 1784 / Lichfield / England)

Samuel Johnson Quotes

  • ''To be idle and to be poor have always been reproaches, and therefore every man endeavours with his utmost care to hide his poverty from others, and his idleness from himself.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in The Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). Idler (London, Aug. 5, 1758), no. 17.
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  • ''A fly, Sir, may sting a stately horse and make him wince; but one is but an insect, and the other is a horse still.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, vol. 1 (1934). Note to entry for March 20, 1776.
  • ''Perhaps man is the only being that can properly be called idle.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 1, Universal Chronicle (London, April 15, 1758). "As peace is the end of war," Johnson wrote, "so to be idle is the ultimate purpose of the busy."
  • ''Some desire is necessary to keep life in motion, and he whose real wants are supplied must admit those of fancy.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Imlac, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 8 (1759).
  • ''Every man who attacks my belief, diminishes in some degree my confidence in it, and therefore makes me uneasy; and I am angry with him who makes me uneasy.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 3, 1775 (1791).
  • ''If pleasure was not followed by pain, who would forbear it?''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 89, Universal Chronicle (London, December 29, 1759).
  • ''Man is not weak; knowledge is more than equivalent to force.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Imlac, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 13 (1759).
  • ''Sir, let me tell you, the noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees is the high road that leads him to England.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, July 6, 1763 (1791).
  • ''Promise, large promise, is the soul of an advertisement.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, Yale Edition, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 40, Universal Chronicle (London, Jan. 20, 1759).
  • ''When I was as you are now, towering in the confidence of twenty-one, little did I suspect that I should be at forty-nine, what I now am.''
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, January 9, 1758. James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791).

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Best Poem of Samuel Johnson

On The Death Of Mr. Robert Levet, A Practiser In Physic

CONDEMN'D to Hope's delusive mine,
As on we toil from day to day,
By sudden blasts or slow decline
Our social comforts drop away.

Well tried through many a varying year,
See Levet to the grave descend,
Officious, innocent, sincere,
Of every friendless name the friend.

Yet still he fills affection's eye,
Obscurely wise and coarsely kind;
Nor, letter'd Arrogance, deny
Thy praise to merit unrefined.

When fainting nature call'd for aid,
And hov'ring death prepared the blow,
His vig'rous remedy display'd
The power of art without the ...

Read the full of On The Death Of Mr. Robert Levet, A Practiser In Physic

Evening Ode

To Stella:

Evening now from purple wings
Sheds the grateful gifts she brings;
Brilliant drops bedeck the mead,
Cooling breezes shake the reed;
Shake the reed, and curl the stream
Silver'd o'er with Cynthia's beam;
Near the chequer'd, lonely grove,

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