Samuel Richardson

(1689-1761 / Mackworth)

Samuel Richardson Quotes

  • ''Women do not often fall in love with philosophers.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Marchese della Poretta (the General), in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 27, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
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  • ''Love before marriage is absolutely necessary.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1740). Mr. B., in Pamela, vol. 2, marriage rule number 21, Riverside (1971).
  • ''Those who doubt themselves most generally err least.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1740). Mr. B., in Pamela, vol. 2, p. 279, Riverside (1971).
  • ''Every thing is pretty that is young.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1740). Mr. B., in Pamela, vol. 1, letter 23, Riverside (1971).
  • ''Smatterers in learning are the most opinionated.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Mr. Walden, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 12, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • ''If the education and studies of children were suited to their inclinations and capacities, many would be made useful members of society that otherwise would make no figure in it.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 336.
  • ''There is a pride, a self-love, in human minds that will seldom be kept so low as to make men and women humbler than they ought to be.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4. P. 361.
  • ''Tutors who make youth learned do not always make them virtuous.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 193.
  • ''The plays and sports of children are as salutary to them as labor and work are to grown persons.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 381.
  • ''The English, the plain English, of the politest address of a gentleman to a lady is, "I am now, dear Madam, your humble servant: Pray be so good as to let me be your Lord and Master."''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 3, p. 195.

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