Sarah Fielding

(1710_1768 / East Stour, Dorset)

Sarah Fielding Quotes

  • ''[W]hat I mean by love ... is this. A sympathetic liking—excited by fancy, directed by judgment—and to which is joined also a most sincere desire of the good and happiness of its object.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. Portia, in The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 1, sc. 5 (1754).
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  • '''Tis this desire of bending all things to our own purposes which turns them into confusion and is the chief source of every error in our lives.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. Portia, in The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 3, sc. 13 (1754).
  • ''I endeavor not to conceal that I believe there is a great mixture of desire in the passion which is called love—or rather, without any far-fetched strain on words, it may be called the companion of love.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. Portia, in The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 1, sc. 5 (1754).
  • ''The words of kindness are more healing to a drooping heart than balm or honey.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The Adventures of David Simple, Volume the Last, bk. 7, ch. 10 (1754).
  • ''[S]haring in common, without any thought of separate property, had ever been their friendly practice, from their first connection.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The Adventures of David Simple, Volume the Last, bk. 6, ch. 1 (1753). Description of the community made up of David and Camilla, Valentine and Cynthia, and their children.
  • ''The supposition that it was possible for any woman to be so mean-spirited as not at least to wish to tear out her rival's eyes was too hard for the digestion of the Cry.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 1, sc. 2 (1754). In this text, the Cry is the name for a group of hostile critics.
  • ''Flattery in courtship is the highest insolence, for whilst it pretends to bestow on you more than you deserve, it is watching an opportunity to take from you what you really have.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 1, sc. 3 (1754).
  • ''[I]f our reader should be neither informed nor amused, we shall be very sorry for his loss of time as well as our own.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, Introduction (1754).
  • ''On the wings of fancy, gentle readers, bear yourselves into the mid-air, where by imagination you may form a large stupendous castle.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 1, prologue (1754).
  • ''[T]he judicious reader ought to know what the chief character in any work of the imagination will naturally perform, according to the situation he is thrown into, as well as doth the author himself.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, prologue to part 5 (1754).

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