Sarah Fielding

(1710_1768 / East Stour, Dorset)

Sarah Fielding Quotes

  • ''[Allegory] is a flight by which the human wit attempts at one and the same time to investigate two objects, and consequently is fitted only to the most exalted geniuses.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, Introduction (1754).
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  • ''If modesty and candor are necessary to an author in his judgment of his own works, no less are they in his reader.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, prologue to part 3 (1754). In the eighteenth century, "candor" signified impartiality, justice, and kindliness.
  • ''But in all things whether we shall make only a due use of the liberties we have asked, is left entirely to the judicious reader to decide.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, Introduction (1754).
  • ''All places were now become irksome to her. She found it impossible to fly from infamy, unless she could at the same time fly from herself.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The History of the Countess of Dellwyn, bk. 4, ch. 11 (1759).
  • ''His lordship pronounced his assent to take to wife his destined prey (in the words "I will"), with a voice as audible as generally breaks forth from a mouth vacated by the inhabitants, its teeth.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The History of the Countess of Dellwyn, bk. 1, ch. 1 (1759). The wedding ceremony in which the young and beautiful Charlotte Lucum marries—for the promise of social advancement for herself and political gain for her father—the old debauchee Lord Lucum.
  • ''Their virtues lived in their children. The family changed its persons but not its manners, and they continued a blessing to the world from generation to generation.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The History of the Countess of Dellwyn, final sentences of the novel (1759). Focus here is on the Bilson family, whose virtue contrasts to the vanity of Lord and Lady Dellwyn.
  • ''A small voice issued from a bed placed in utter darkness where no ray of light was admitted, complaining of bad nerves, low spirits, and terrible dreams.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. The History of the Countess of Dellwyn, bk. 1, ch. 11 (1759).
  • ''I was condemned to be beheaded, or burnt, as the king pleased; and he was graciously pleased, from the great remains of his love, to choose the mildest sentence.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist. Last chapter of Henry Fielding's Journey from This World to the Next (1743). Anna Boleyn, in "The History of Anna Boleyn," (1743). Attributed to Sarah Fielding.
  • ''Agreeable then to my present inclination, I formed the object of my own worship, which was no other than my own understanding.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. Cylinda, in The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 4, sc. 1 (1754).
  • ''[F]or as Socrates says that a wise man is a citizen of the world, so I thought that a wise woman was equally at liberty to range through every station or degree of men, to fix her choice wherever she pleased.''
    Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. Cylinda, in The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, part 4, sc. 3 (1754).

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